Cytoscape.js

Graph theory (network) library for visualisation and analysis

Demos

Introduction

Factsheet

About

Cytoscape.js is an open-source graph theory (a.k.a. network) library written in JS. You can use Cytoscape.js for graph analysis and visualisation.

Cytoscape.js allows you to easily display and manipulate rich, interactive graphs. Because Cytoscape.js allows the user to interact with the graph and the library allows the client to hook into user events, Cytoscape.js is easily integrated into your app, especially since Cytoscape.js supports both desktop browsers, like Chrome, and mobile browsers, like on the iPad. Cytoscape.js includes all the gestures you would expect out-of-the-box, including pinch-to-zoom, box selection, panning, et cetera.

Cytoscape.js also has graph analysis in mind: The library contains many useful functions in graph theory. You can use Cytoscape.js headlessly on Node.js to do graph analysis in the terminal or on a web server.

Cytoscape.js is an open-source project, and anyone is free to contribute. For more information, refer to the GitHub README.

The library was created at the Donnelly Centre at the University of Toronto. It is the successor of Cytoscape Web.

Packages

Releases

Citation

To cite Cytoscape.js in a paper, please cite the Oxford Bioinformatics issue:

Cytoscape.js: a graph theory library for visualisation and analysis

Franz M, Lopes CT, Huck G, Dong Y, Sumer O, Bader GD

Bioinformatics (2016) 32 (2): 309-311 first published online September 28, 2015 doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btv557 (PDF)

PubMed abstract

Funding

Funding for Cytoscape.js and Cytoscape is provided by NRNB (U.S. National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources grant numbers P41 RR031228 and GM103504) and by NIH grants 2R01GM070743 and 1U41HG006623. The following organizations help develop Cytoscape:

ISB | UCSD | MSKCC | Pasteur | Agilent | UCSF | Unilever | Toronto | NCIBI | NRNB

Notation

Graph model

Cytoscape.js supports many different graph theory usecases. It supports directed graphs, undirected graphs, mixed graphs, loops, multigraphs, compound graphs (a type of hypergraph), and so on.

We are regularly making additions and enhancements to the library, and we gladly accept feature requests and pull requests.

Architecture & API

There are two components in the architecture that a programmer need concern himself in order to use Cytoscape.js, the core (i.e. a graph instance) and the collection. In Cytoscape.js, the core is a programmer’s main entry point into the library. From the core, a programmer can run layouts, alter the viewport, and perform other operations on the graph as a whole.

The core provides several functions to access elements in the graph. Each of these functions returns a collection, a set of elements in the graph. Functions are available on collections that allow the programmer to filter the collection, perform operations on the collection, traverse the graph about the collection, get data about elements in the collection, and so on.

Note that a collection is immutable by default, meaning that the set of elements within a collection can not be changed. The API returns a new collection with different elements when necessary, instead of mutating the existing collection. This allows the programmer to safely use set theory operations on collections, use collections functionally, and so on. Note that because a collection is just a list of elements, it is relatively inexpensive to create new collections.

For very performance intensive code, a collection can be treated as mutable with eles.merge() and eles.unmerge(). Most apps should never need these functions.

Functions

There are several types that different functions can be executed on, and the variable names used to denote these types in the documentation are outlined below:

Shorthand Works on
cy the core
eles a collection of one or more elements (nodes and edges)
ele a collection of a single element (node or edge)
nodes a collection of one or more nodes
node a collection of a single node
edges a collection of one or more edges
edge a collection of a single edge
layout a layout
ani an animation

By default, a function returns a reference back to the calling object to allow for chaining (e.g. obj.fn1().fn2().fn3()). Unless otherwise indicated in this documentation, a function is chainable in this manner unless a different return value is specified. This applies both to the core and to collections.

For functions that return a value, note that calling a singular — ele, node, or edge — function on a collection of more than one element will return the expected value for only the first element.

Object ownership

When passing objects to Cytoscape.js for creating elements, animations, layouts, etc., the objects are considered owned by Cytoscape. Objects like elements have several levels to them, and doing deep copies of those objects every time they are passed to Cytoscape creates additional expense. When desired, the programmer can copy objects manually before passing them to Cytoscape. However, copying is not necessary for most programmers most of the time.

Gestures

Cytoscape.js supports several gestures:

All gesture actions can be controlled by the programmer, toggling them on or off whenever needed.

Position

A node’s position refers to the centre point of its body.

There is an important distinction to make for position: A position may be a model position or a rendered position.

A model position — as its name suggests — is the position stored in the model for an element. An element’s model position remains constant, despite changes to zoom and pan. Numeric style property values are specified in model co-ordinates, e.g. a node with width 20px will be 20 pixels wide at zoom 1.

A rendered position is an on-screen location relative to the viewport. For example, a rendered position of { x: 100, y: 100 } specifies a point 100 pixels to the right and 100 pixels down from the top-left corner of the viewport. The model position and rendered position are the same at zoom 1 and pan (0, 0).

An element’s rendered position naturally changes as zoom and pan changes, because the element’s on-screen position in the viewport changes as zooming and panning are applied. Panning is always measured in rendered coordinates.

In this documentation, “position” refers to model position unless otherwise stated.

A node’s position can be set manually, or it can be set automatically using a layout. Because the positions of two nodes influence the lengths of the edges in between them, a layout effectively sets edge lengths.

Elements JSON

Examples are given that outline format of the elements JSON used to load elements into Cytoscape.js:

cytoscape({

  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  elements: [ // flat array of nodes and edges
    { // node n1
      group: 'nodes', // 'nodes' for a node, 'edges' for an edge
      // NB the group field can be automatically inferred for you but specifying it
      // gives you nice debug messages if you mis-init elements


      data: { // element data (put json serialisable dev data here)
        id: 'n1', // mandatory (string or number) id for each element, assigned automatically on undefined
        parent: 'nparent', // indicates the compound node parent id; not defined => no parent
        // (`parent` can be effectively changed by `eles.move()`)
      },

      // scratchpad data (usually temp or nonserialisable data)
      scratch: {
        _foo: 'bar' // app fields prefixed by underscore; extension fields unprefixed
      },

      position: { // the model position of the node (optional on init, mandatory after)
        x: 100,
        y: 100
      },

      selected: false, // whether the element is selected (default false)

      selectable: true, // whether the selection state is mutable (default true)

      locked: false, // when locked a node's position is immutable (default false)

      grabbable: true, // whether the node can be grabbed and moved by the user

      classes: ['foo', 'bar'] // an array (or a space separated string) of class names that the element has
    },

    { // node n2
      data: { id: 'n2' },
      renderedPosition: { x: 200, y: 200 } // can alternatively specify position in rendered on-screen pixels
    },

    { // node n3
      data: { id: 'n3', parent: 'nparent' },
      position: { x: 123, y: 234 }
    },

    { // node nparent
      data: { id: 'nparent' }
    },

    { // edge e1
      data: {
        id: 'e1',
        // inferred as an edge because `source` and `target` are specified:
        source: 'n1', // the source node id (edge comes from this node)
        target: 'n2'  // the target node id (edge goes to this node)
        // (`source` and `target` can be effectively changed by `eles.move()`)
      }
    }
  ],

  layout: {
    name: 'preset'
  },

  // so we can see the ids
  style: [
    {
      selector: 'node',
      style: {
        'label': 'data(id)'
      }
    }
  ]

});

The elements JSON may alternatively be in the following format, keyed by group:

cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  elements: {
    nodes: [
      {
        data: { id: 'a' }
      },

      {
        data: { id: 'b' }
      }
    ],
    edges: [
      {
        data: { id: 'ab', source: 'a', target: 'b' }
      }
    ]
  },

  layout: {
    name: 'grid',
    rows: 1
  },

  // so we can see the ids
  style: [
    {
      selector: 'node',
      style: {
        'label': 'data(id)'
      }
    }
  ]
});

Compound nodes

Compound nodes are an addition to the traditional graph model. A compound node contains a number of child nodes, similar to how a HTML DOM element can contain a number of child elements.

Compound nodes are specified via the parent field in an element’s data. Similar to the source and target fields of edges, the parent field is immutable: A node’s parent can be specified when the node is added to the graph, and after that point, this parent-child relationship is immutable. However, you can effectively move child nodes via eles.move().

A compound parent node does not have independent dimensions (position and size), as those values are automatically inferred by the positions and dimensions of the descendant nodes.

As far as the API is concerned, compound nodes are treated just like regular nodes — except in explicitly compound functions like node.parent(). This means that traditional graph theory functions like eles.dijkstra() and eles.neighborhood() do not make special allowances for compound nodes, so you may need to make different calls to the API depending on your usecase.

For instance:

var a = cy.$('#a'); // assume a compound node

// the neighbourhood of `a` contains directly connected elements
var directlyConnected = a.neighborhood();

// you may want everything connected to its descendants instead
// because the descendants "belong" to `a`
var indirectlyConnected = a.add( a.descendants() ).neighborhood();

Getting started

This section will familiarise you with the basic steps necessary to start using Cytoscape.js.

Including Cytoscape.js

If you are using a simple HTML environment (without a build system), then include Cytoscape.js in a <script> tag, e.g.:

<script src="cytoscape.min.js"></script>

To use Cytoscape.js from a CDN, use CDNJS or Unpkg. Please do not hotlink to copies of Cytoscape.js from the documentation — they’re just for the demos.

The available files are available under cytoscape/dist/ in the npm package:

Note that Cytoscape.js uses the dimensions of your HTML DOM element container for layouts and rendering at initialisation. Thus, it is very important to place your CSS stylesheets in the <head> before any Cytoscape.js-related code. Otherwise, dimensions may be sporadically reported incorrectly, resulting in undesired behaviour.

Your stylesheet may include something like this (assuming a DOM element with ID cy is used as the container):

#cy {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  display: block;
}

To install Cytoscape.js via npm:

npm install cytoscape

To use Cytoscape.js in a ESM environment with npm (e.g. Webpack or Node.js with the esm package):

import cytoscape from 'cytoscape';

To use Cytoscape.js in a CommonJS environment like Node.js:

var cytoscape = require('cytoscape');

To use Cytoscape.js with AMD/Require.js:

require(['cytoscape'], function(cytoscape){
  // ...
});

To install Cytoscape.js via Bower:

bower install cytoscape

To install Cytoscape.js via Meteor/Atmosphere:

npm install cytoscape

Cytoscape.js supports environments with ES5 or newer, as it is transpiled by Babel and it uses only basic features of the standard library. Feature detection is used for optional features that improve performance. However, a future version of Cytoscape.js may require a more up-to-date version of the standard library. You may want to use babel-polyfill or core-js if you want to support old browsers in future.

Initialisation

An instance of Cytoscape.js corresponds to a graph. You can create an instance as follows:

var cy = cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy') // container to render in
});

You can pass a jQuery instance as the container for convenience:

var cy = cytoscape({
  container: $('#cy')
});

If you are running Cytoscape.js in Node.js or otherwise running it headlessly, you will not specify the container option. In implicitly headless environments like Node.js, an instance is automatically headless. To explicitly run a headless instance (e.g. in the browser) you can specify options.headless as true.

Specifying basic options

For visualisation, the container, elements, style, and layout options usually should be set:

var cy = cytoscape({

  container: document.getElementById('cy'), // container to render in

  elements: [ // list of graph elements to start with
    { // node a
      data: { id: 'a' }
    },
    { // node b
      data: { id: 'b' }
    },
    { // edge ab
      data: { id: 'ab', source: 'a', target: 'b' }
    }
  ],

  style: [ // the stylesheet for the graph
    {
      selector: 'node',
      style: {
        'background-color': '#666',
        'label': 'data(id)'
      }
    },

    {
      selector: 'edge',
      style: {
        'width': 3,
        'line-color': '#ccc',
        'target-arrow-color': '#ccc',
        'target-arrow-shape': 'triangle'
      }
    }
  ],

  layout: {
    name: 'grid',
    rows: 1
  }

});

Next steps

Now that you have a core (graph) instance with basic options, explore the core API. It’s your entry point to all the features in Cytoscape.js.

If you have code questions about Cytoscape.js, please feel free to post your question to Stackoverflow.

Core

The core object is your interface to a graph. It is your entry point to Cytoscape.js: All of the library’s features are accessed through this object.

Initialisation

Initialisation

A graph can be created as follows:

var cy = cytoscape({ /* options */ });

You can initialise the core without any options. If you want to use Cytoscape as a visualisation, then a container DOM element is required, e.g.:

var cy = cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy')
});

Note that in order to guarantee custom font usage (WOFF/WOFF2), the fonts in question must be loaded before Cytoscape is initialised.

The following sections go over the options in more detail.

Initialisation options

An instance of Cytoscape.js has a number of options that can be set on initialisation. They are outlined below with their default values.

Note that everything is optional. By default, you get an empty graph with the default stylesheet. Environments outside the browser (e.g. Node.js) are automatically set as headless for convenience.

var cy = cytoscape({
  // very commonly used options
  container: undefined,
  elements: [ /* ... */ ],
  style: [ /* ... */ ],
  layout: { name: 'grid' /* , ... */ },

  // initial viewport state:
  zoom: 1,
  pan: { x: 0, y: 0 },

  // interaction options:
  minZoom: 1e-50,
  maxZoom: 1e50,
  zoomingEnabled: true,
  userZoomingEnabled: true,
  panningEnabled: true,
  userPanningEnabled: true,
  boxSelectionEnabled: false,
  selectionType: 'single',
  touchTapThreshold: 8,
  desktopTapThreshold: 4,
  autolock: false,
  autoungrabify: false,
  autounselectify: false,

  // rendering options:
  headless: false,
  styleEnabled: true,
  hideEdgesOnViewport: false,
  hideLabelsOnViewport: false,
  textureOnViewport: false,
  motionBlur: false,
  motionBlurOpacity: 0.2,
  wheelSensitivity: 1,
  pixelRatio: 'auto'
});

Very commonly used options

container : A HTML DOM element in which the graph should be rendered. This is unspecified if Cytoscape.js is run headlessly. The container is expected to be an empty div; the visualisation owns the div.

elements : An array of elements specified as plain objects. For convenience, this option can alternatively be specified as a promise that resolves to the elements JSON.

style : The stylesheet used to style the graph. For convenience, this option can alternatively be specified as a promise that resolves to the stylesheet.

layout : A plain object that specifies layout options. Which layout is initially run is specified by the name field. Refer to a layout’s documentation for the options it supports. If you want to specify your node positions yourself in your elements JSON, you can use the preset layout — by default it does not set any positions, leaving your nodes in their current positions (i.e. specified in options.elements at initialisation time).

Initial viewport state

zoom : The initial zoom level of the graph. Make sure to disable viewport manipulation options, such as fit, in your layout so that it is not overridden when the layout is applied. You can set options.minZoom and options.maxZoom to set restrictions on the zoom level.

pan : The initial panning position of the graph. Make sure to disable viewport manipulation options, such as fit, in your layout so that it is not overridden when the layout is applied.

Interaction options

minZoom : A minimum bound on the zoom level of the graph. The viewport can not be scaled smaller than this zoom level.

maxZoom : A maximum bound on the zoom level of the graph. The viewport can not be scaled larger than this zoom level.

zoomingEnabled : Whether zooming the graph is enabled, both by user events and programmatically.

userZoomingEnabled : Whether user events (e.g. mouse wheel, pinch-to-zoom) are allowed to zoom the graph. Programmatic changes to zoom are unaffected by this option.

panningEnabled : Whether panning the graph is enabled, both by user events and programmatically.

userPanningEnabled : Whether user events (e.g. dragging the graph background) are allowed to pan the graph. Programmatic changes to pan are unaffected by this option.

boxSelectionEnabled : Whether box selection (i.e. drag a box overlay around, and release it to select) is enabled. If enabled, the user must taphold to pan the graph.

selectionType : A string indicating the selection behaviour from user input. For 'additive', a new selection made by the user adds to the set of currently selected elements. For 'single', a new selection made by the user becomes the entire set of currently selected elements (i.e. the previous elements are unselected).

touchTapThreshold & desktopTapThreshold : A non-negative integer that indicates the maximum allowable distance that a user may move during a tap gesture, on touch devices and desktop devices respectively. This makes tapping easier for users. These values have sane defaults, so it is not advised to change these options unless you have very good reason for doing so. Large values will almost certainly have undesirable consequences.

autoungrabify : Whether nodes should be ungrabified (not grabbable by user) by default (if true, overrides individual node state).

autolock : Whether nodes should be locked (not draggable at all) by default (if true, overrides individual node state).

autounselectify : Whether nodes should be unselectified (immutable selection state) by default (if true, overrides individual element state).

Rendering options

headless : A convenience option that initialises the instance to run headlessly. You do not need to set this in environments that are implicitly headless (e.g. Node.js). However, it is handy to set headless: true if you want a headless instance in a browser.

styleEnabled : A boolean that indicates whether styling should be used. For headless (i.e. outside the browser) environments, display is not necessary and so neither is styling necessary — thereby speeding up your code. You can manually enable styling in headless environments if you require it for a special case. Note that it does not make sense to disable style if you plan on rendering the graph. Also note that cy.destroy() must be called to clean up a style-enabled, headless instance.

hideEdgesOnViewport : A rendering hint that when set to true makes the renderer not render edges while the viewport is being manipulated. This makes panning, zooming, dragging, et cetera more responsive for large graphs. This option is now largely moot, as a result of performance enhancements.

textureOnViewport : A rendering hint that when set to true makes the renderer use a texture during panning and zooming instead of drawing the elements, making large graphs more responsive. This option is now largely moot, as a result of performance enhancements.

motionBlur : A rendering hint that when set to true makes the renderer use a motion blur effect to make the transition between frames seem smoother. This can increase the perceived performance for a large graphs. This option is now largely moot, as a result of performance enhancements.

motionBlurOpacity : When motionBlur: true, this value controls the opacity of motion blur frames. Higher values make the motion blur effect more pronounced. This option is now largely moot, as a result of performance enhancements.

wheelSensitivity : Changes the scroll wheel sensitivity when zooming. This is a multiplicative modifier. So, a value between 0 and 1 reduces the sensitivity (zooms slower), and a value greater than 1 increases the sensitivity (zooms faster). This option is set to a sane value that works well for mainstream mice (Apple, Logitech, Microsoft) on Linux, Mac, and Windows. If the default value seems too fast or too slow on your particular system, you may have non-default mouse settings in your OS or a niche mouse. You should not change this value unless your app is meant to work only on specific hardware. Otherwise, you risk making zooming too slow or too fast for most users.

pixelRatio : Overrides the screen pixel ratio with a manually set value (1.0 recommended, if set). This can be used to increase performance on high density displays by reducing the effective area that needs to be rendered, though this is much less necessary on more recent browser releases. If you want to use the hardware’s actual pixel ratio, you can set pixelRatio: 'auto' (default).

Graph manipulation

cy.add()        

Add elements to the graph and return them.

cy.add( eleObj )

Add a specified element to the graph.

  • eleObj

    A plain object that specifies the element.

cy.add( eleObjs )

Add the specified elements to the graph.

  • eleObjs

    An array of elements specified by plain objects.

cy.add( eles )

Add the specified elements to the graph.

  • eles

    A collection of elements.

Details

If plain element objects are used, then the same format used at initialisation must be followed.

If a collection of existing elements is specified to a different core instance, then copies of those elements are added, which allows for elements to be effectively transferred between instances of Cytoscape.js.

Examples

Add a node from a plain object.

cy.add({
    group: 'nodes',
    data: { weight: 75 },
    position: { x: 200, y: 200 }
});

Add nodes and edges to the graph as plain objects:

// can use reference to eles later
var eles = cy.add([
  { group: 'nodes', data: { id: 'n0' }, position: { x: 100, y: 100 } },
  { group: 'nodes', data: { id: 'n1' }, position: { x: 200, y: 200 } },
  { group: 'edges', data: { id: 'e0', source: 'n0', target: 'n1' } }
]);
cy.remove()      

Remove elements from the graph and return them.

cy.remove( eles )

Remove the specified elements.

  • eles

    A collection of elements to remove.

cy.remove( selector )

Remove elements in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    Elements matching this selector are removed.

Details

Note that removing a node necessarily removes its connected edges.

Though the elements specified to this function are removed from the graph, they may still exist in memory. However, almost all functions will not work on removed elements. For example, the eles.neighborhood() function will fail for a removed element: An element outside of the context of the graph can not have a neighbourhood defined. A removed element exists only so you can restore it back to the originating core instance or to a new instance.

Examples

Remove an element:

var j = cy.$('#j');
cy.remove( j );

Remove a collection:

var collection = cy.elements('node[weight > 50]');
cy.remove( collection );

Remove elements matching a selector:

cy.remove('node[weight > 50]'); // remove nodes with weight greater than 50
cy.collection()    

Return a new, empty collection.

cy.collection()

Get an empty collection.

Details

This function is useful for building up collections.

Examples

Keep a collection of nodes that have been clicked:

var collection = cy.collection();
cy.nodes().on('click', function(e){
  var clickedNode = e.target;

  collection = collection.union(clickedNode);
});
cy.getElementById()      
Aliases: cy.$id(),

Get an element from its ID in a very performant way.

cy.getElementById( id )
  • id

    The ID of the element to get.

Examples

cy.getElementById('j');

Using the shorter alias:

cy.$id('j');
cy.$() et al              

Get elements in the graph matching a selector or a filter function.

cy.$( selector )

Get elements in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector the elements should match.

cy.elements( selector )

Get elements in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector the elements should match.

cy.nodes( selector )

Get nodes in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector the nodes should match.

cy.edges( selector )

Get edges in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector the edges should match.

cy.filter( selector )

Get elements in the graph matching the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector the elements should match.

cy.filter( function(ele, i, eles) )

Get elements in the graph matching the specified filter function.

  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The filter function that returns true for elements that should be returned.

    • ele

      The current element under consideration for filtering.

    • i

      The counter used for iteration over the elements in the graph.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being filtered

Details

If no elements in the graph match the selector, an empty collection is returned.

The function cy.$() acts as an alias to cy.filter(): It lets you type less characters. It is analogous to the jQuery $ alias used to search the document

Examples

Get nodes with weight greater than 50:

cy.nodes('[weight > 50]');

Get edges with source node n0:

cy.edges('[source = "j"]');

Get all nodes and edges with weight greater than 50:

cy.elements('[weight > 50]');
cy.filter('[weight > 50]'); // works the same as the above line

Get nodes with weight greater than 50 with a filter function:

cy.filter(function(element, i){
  return element.isNode() && element.data('weight') > 50;
});
cy.batch() et al        

Allow for manipulation of elements without triggering multiple style calculations or multiple redraws.

cy.batch( function() )
  • function()

    A callback within which you can make batch updates to elements.

cy.startBatch()

Starts batching manually (useful for asynchronous cases).

cy.endBatch()

Ends batching manually (useful for asynchronous cases).

Details

Normally, when you modify elements, each modification can trigger a style calculation and a redraw — depending on timing for a redraw. For example, the following will cause two style calculations and at least one draw:

cy.$('#j')
  .data('weight', '70')   // style update
  .addClass('funny')      // style update AGAIN
  .removeClass('serious') // style update YET AGAIN

  // at least 1 redraw here
  // possibly 3 total depending on speed of above operations
  // (for one ele almost certainly 1 redraw, but consider many eles)
;

This is not a problem for a handful of operations on a handful of elements, but for many operations on many elements you end up with redundant style calculations and probably redundant redraws. In the worst case, you have eles.length * numOps style updates and redraws — and both style updates and redraws can be expensive. In the worst case when using cy.batch(), you limit the style updates to eles.length and you limit the redraws to just one.

Thus, this function is useful for making many changes to elements at once. When the specified callback function is complete, only elements that require it have their style updated and the renderer makes at most a single redraw.

This makes for very efficient modifications to elements, but it has some caveats. While inside the batch callback,

  • you can not reliably read element style or dimensions (it may have changed, or computed values may be out of date),
  • you probably do not want to use eles.style() et cetera because they force a style bypass rather than a recalculation.

Examples

Synchronous style:

cy.batch(function(){
  cy.$('#j')
    .data('weight', '70')
    .addClass('funny')
    .removeClass('serious')
  ;
});

Asynchronous style:

cy.startBatch();

cy.$('#j')
  .data('weight', '70')
  .addClass('funny')
  .removeClass('serious')
;

cy.endBatch();
cy.mount()    

Attaches the instance to the specified container for visualisation.

cy.mount( container )
  • container

    A HTML DOM element in which the graph should be rendered.

Details

If the core instance is headless prior to calling cy.mount(), then the instance will no longer be headless and the visualisation will be shown in the specified container. If the core instance is non-headless prior to calling cy.mount(), then the visualisation is swapped from the prior container to the specified container.

cy.unmount()  

Remove the instance from its current container.

Details

This function sets the instance to be headless after unmounting from the current container.

cy.destroy()  

A convenience function to explicitly destroy the instance.

Details

The cy.destroy() function is not necessary but can be convenient in some cases. It cleans up references and rendering loops such that the memory used by an instance can be garbage collected.

If you remove the container DOM element from the page, then the instance is cleaned up automatically. Similarly, calling cy.destroy() does this cleanup and removes all the container’s children from the page.

When running Cytoscape.js headlessly, using cy.destroy() is necessary only if you’ve explicitly enabled style functionality.

To drop the memory used by an instance, it is necessary to drop all of your own references to that instance so it can be garbage collected.

cy.scratch()        
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Set or get scratchpad data, where temporary or non-JSON data can be stored. App-level scratchpad data should use namespaces prefixed with underscore, like '_foo'. This is analogous to the more common ele.scratch() but for graph global data.

cy.scratch()

Get the entire scratchpad object for the core.

cy.scratch( namespace )

Get the scratchpad at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

cy.scratch( namespacevalue )

Set the scratchpad at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

  • value

    The value to set at the specified namespace.

cy.removeScratch()    
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Remove scratchpad data. You should remove scratchpad data only at your own namespaces. This is analogous to the more common ele.removeScratch() but for graph global data.

cy.removeScratch( namespace )

Remove the scratchpad data at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

Note that ele.removeScratch() sets the scratchpad object for the specified namespace to undefined. This allows you to use meaningful null values.

Events

cy.on()          
Aliases: cy.bind(), cy.listen(), cy.addListener(),

Listen to events that occur in the graph.

cy.on( events [selector]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A selector to specify elements for which the handler runs.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

Examples

Listen to events that bubble up from elements matching the specified node selector:

cy.on('tap', 'node', function(evt){
  var node = evt.target;
  console.log( 'tapped ' + node.id() );
});

Listen to all tap events that the core receives:

cy.on('tap', function(event){
  // target holds a reference to the originator
  // of the event (core or element)
  var evtTarget = event.target;

  if( evtTarget === cy ){
    console.log('tap on background');
  } else {
    console.log('tap on some element');
  }
});
cy.promiseOn()      
Aliases: cy.pon(),

Get a promise that is resolved when the core emits the first of any of the specified events.

cy.promiseOn( events [selector] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A selector to specify elements for which the handler runs.

Examples

cy.pon('tap').then(function( event ){
  console.log('tap promise fulfilled');
});
cy.one()    

Listen to events that occur in the graph, and run the handler only once.

cy.one( events [selector]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A selector to specify elements for which the handler runs.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

Examples

cy.one('tap', 'node', function(){
  console.log('tap!');
});

cy.$('node').eq(0).trigger('tap'); // tap!
cy.$('node').eq(1).trigger('tap'); // nothing b/c already tapped
cy.removeListener()          
Aliases: cy.off(), cy.unbind(), cy.unlisten(),

Remove event handlers.

cy.removeListener( events [selector] [handler] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    The same selector used to listen to the events.

  • handler [optional]

    A reference to the handler function to remove.

Examples

For all handlers:

cy.on('tap', function(){ /* ... */ });

// remove all tap listener handlers, including the one above
cy.removeListener('tap');

For a particular handler:

var handler = function(){
  console.log('called handler');
};
cy.on('tap', handler);

var otherHandler = function(){
  console.log('called other handler');
};
cy.on('tap', otherHandler);

// just remove handler
cy.removeListener('tap', handler);
cy.emit()      
Aliases: cy.trigger(),

Emit one or more events.

cy.emit( events [extraParams] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names to emit.

  • extraParams [optional]

    An array of additional parameters to pass to the handler.

Examples

cy.on('tap', function(evt, f, b){
  console.log('tap', f, b);
});

cy.emit('tap', ['foo', 'bar']);
cy.ready()    

Run a callback as soon as the graph becomes ready (i.e. intitial data loaded and initial layout completed). If the graph is already ready, then the callback is called immediately. If data is loaded synchronously and the layout used is discrete/synchronous/unanimated/unspecified, then you don't need cy.ready().

cy.ready( function(event) )
  • function(event)

    The callback run as soon as the graph is ready.

Viewport manipulation

cy.container()  

Get the HTML DOM element in which the graph is visualised. A null value is returned if the instance is headless.

cy.center()        
Aliases: cy.centre(),

Pan the graph to the centre of a collection.

cy.center()

Centre on all elements in the graph.

cy.center( eles )

Centre on the specified elements.

  • eles

    The collection to centre upon.

Details

If no collection is specified, then the graph is centred on all nodes and edges in the graph.

Examples

Centre the graph on node j:

var j = cy.$('#j');
cy.center( j );
cy.fit()      

Pan and zooms the graph to fit to a collection.

cy.fit()

Fit to all elements in the graph.

cy.fit( [eles] [padding] )

Fit to the specified elements.

  • eles [optional]

    The collection to fit to.

  • padding [optional]

    An amount of padding (in rendered pixels) to have around the graph (default 0).

Details

If no collection is specified, then the graph is fit to all nodes and edges in the graph.

Examples

Fit the graph on nodes j and e:

cy.fit( cy.$('#j, #e') );
cy.reset()    

Reset the graph to the default zoom level and panning position.

cy.reset()

Resets the zoom and pan.

Details

This resets the viewport to the origin (0, 0) at zoom level 1.

Examples

setTimeout( function(){
  cy.pan({ x: 50, y: -100 });
}, 1000 );

setTimeout( function(){
  cy.zoom( 2 );
}, 2000 );

setTimeout( function(){
  cy.reset();
}, 3000 );
cy.pan()      

Get or set the panning position of the graph.

cy.pan()

Get the current panning position.

cy.pan( renderedPosition )

Set the current panning position.

Details

This function pans the graph viewport origin to the specified rendered pixel position.

Examples

Pan the graph to (100, 100) rendered pixels.

cy.pan({
  x: 100,
  y: 100 
});

console.log( cy.pan() ); // prints { x: 100, y: 100 }
cy.panBy()    

Relatively pan the graph by a specified rendered position vector.

cy.panBy( renderedPosition )

Details

This function shifts the viewport relatively by the specified position in rendered pixels. That is, specifying a shift of 100 to the right means a translation of 100 on-screen pixels to the right.

Examples

Pan the graph 100 pixels to the right.

cy.panBy({
  x: 100,
  y: 0 
});
cy.panningEnabled()      

Get or set whether panning is enabled.

cy.panningEnabled()

Get whether panning is enabled.

cy.panningEnabled( bool )

Set whether panning is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables panning; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.panningEnabled( true );

Disable:

cy.panningEnabled( false );
cy.userPanningEnabled()      

Get or set whether panning by user events (e.g. dragging the graph background) is enabled.

cy.userPanningEnabled()

Get whether user panning is enabled.

cy.userPanningEnabled( bool )

Set whether user panning is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables user panning; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.userPanningEnabled( true );

Disable:

cy.userPanningEnabled( false );
cy.zoom()        

Get or set the zoom level of the graph.

cy.zoom()

Get the zoom level.

cy.zoom( level )

Set the zoom level.

  • level

    The zoom level to set.

cy.zoom( options )

Set the zoom level.

  • options

    The options for zooming.

    • level

      The zoom level to set.

    • position

      The position about which to zoom.

    • renderedPosition

      The rendered position about which to zoom.

Details

The zoom level must be a positive number. Zoom levels that are not numbers are ignored; zoom levels that are numbers but outside of the range of valid zoom levels are considered to be the closest, valid zoom level.

When zooming about a point via cy.zoom( options ), the options are defined as follows.

For zooming about a rendered position (i.e. a position on-screen):

cy.zoom({
  level: 2.0, // the zoom level
  renderedPosition: { x: 100, y: 100 }
});

For zooming about a model position:

cy.zoom({
  level: 2.0, // the zoom level
  position: { x: 0, y: 0 }
});

You can zoom about a position or a rendered position but not both. You should specify only one of options.position or options.renderedPosition.

Examples

Zoom in to factor 2

cy.zoom(2);

Zoom in to the minimum zoom factor

cy.zoom(0); // 0 is outside of the valid range and
            // its closest valid level is the min

Zoom in to the maximum zoom factor

cy.zoom(1/0); // infinity is outside of the valid range and
              // its closest valid level is the max

Zoom about a node

cy.zoom({
  level: 1.5,
  position: cy.getElementById('j').position()
});
cy.zoomingEnabled()      

Get or set whether zooming is enabled.

cy.zoomingEnabled()

Get whether zooming is enabled.

cy.zoomingEnabled( bool )

Set whether zooming is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables zooming; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.zoomingEnabled( true );

Disable:

cy.zoomingEnabled( false );
cy.userZoomingEnabled()      

Get or set whether zooming by user events (e.g. mouse wheel, pinch-to-zoom) is enabled.

cy.userZoomingEnabled()

Get whether user zooming is enabled.

cy.userZoomingEnabled( bool )

Set whether user zooming is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables user zooming; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.userZoomingEnabled( true );

Disable:

cy.userZoomingEnabled( false );
cy.minZoom()      

Get or set the minimum zoom level.

cy.minZoom()

Get the minimum zoom level.

cy.minZoom( zoom )

Set the minimum zoom level.

  • zoom

    The new minimum zoom level to use.

cy.maxZoom()      

Get or set the maximum zoom level.

cy.maxZoom()

Get the maximum zoom level.

cy.maxZoom( zoom )

Set the maximum zoom level.

  • zoom

    The new maximum zoom level to use.

cy.viewport()    

Set the viewport state (pan & zoom) in one call.

cy.viewport( zoompan )
  • zoom

    The zoom level to set.

  • pan

    The pan to set (a rendered position).

Examples

cy.viewport({
  zoom: 2,
  pan: { x: 100, y: 100 }
});
cy.boxSelectionEnabled()      

Get or set whether box selection is enabled. If enabled along with panning, the user must hold one of shift, control, meta, or alt down to initiate box selection.

cy.boxSelectionEnabled()

Get whether box selection is enabled.

cy.boxSelectionEnabled( bool )

Set whether box selection is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables box selection; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.boxSelectionEnabled( true );

Disable:

cy.boxSelectionEnabled( false );
cy.selectionType()      

Get or set the selection type. The 'single' selection type is the default, tapping an element selects that element and deselects the previous elements. The 'additive' selection type toggles the selection state of an element when tapped.

cy.selectionType()

Get the selection type string.

cy.selectionType( type )

Set the selection type.

  • type

    The selection type string; one of 'single' (default) or 'additive'.

cy.width()  

Get the on-screen width of the viewport in pixels.

cy.height()  

Get the on-screen height of the viewport in pixels.

cy.extent()  

Get the extent of the viewport, a bounding box in model co-ordinates that lets you know what model positions are visible in the viewport.

Details

This function returns a plain object bounding box with format { x1, y1, x2, y2, w, h }.

cy.autolock()      

Get or set whether nodes are automatically locked (i.e. if true, nodes are locked despite their individual state).

cy.autolock()

Get whether autolocking is enabled.

cy.autolock( bool )

Set whether autolocking is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables autolocking; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.autolock( true );

Disable:

cy.autolock( false );
cy.autoungrabify()      

Get or set whether nodes are automatically ungrabified (i.e. if true, nodes are ungrabbale despite their individual state).

cy.autoungrabify()

Get whether autoungrabifying is enabled.

cy.autoungrabify( bool )

Set whether autoungrabifying is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables autoungrabbifying; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.autoungrabify( true );

Disable:

cy.autoungrabify( false );
cy.autounselectify()      

Get or set whether nodes are automatically unselectified (i.e. if true, nodes are unselectable despite their individual state).

cy.autounselectify()

Get whether autounselectifying is enabled.

cy.autounselectify( bool )

Set whether autounselectifying is enabled.

  • bool

    A truthy value enables autounselectifying; a falsey value disables it.

Examples

Enable:

cy.autounselectify( true );

Disable:

cy.autounselectify( false );
cy.resize()    
Aliases: cy.invalidateDimensions(),

Force the renderer to recalculate the viewport bounds.

Details

If your code resizes the graph’s dimensions or position (i.e. by changing the style of the HTML DOM element that holds the graph, or by changing the DOM element’s position in the DOM tree), you will want to call cy.resize() to have the graph resize and redraw itself.

If tapping in the graph is offset rather than at the correct position, then a call to cy.resize() is necessary. Tapping can also become offset if the container element is not empty; the container is expected to be empty so the visualisation can use it.

Cytoscape.js can not automatically monitor the bounding box of the viewport, as querying the DOM for those dimensions can be expensive. Although cy.resize() is automatically called for you on the window‘s resize event, there is no resize or style event for arbitrary DOM elements.

Animation

cy.animated()  

Get whether the viewport is currently being animated.

cy.animate()    

Animate the viewport.

cy.animate( options )
  • options

    An object containing the details of the animation.

    • zoom

      A zoom level (number) or a zoom configuration object to which the graph will be animated.

      • level

        The zoom level to use.

      • position

        The position about which zooming occurs. This automatically modifies the pan such that the specified model position remains at the same position in the viewport extent during zooming.

      • renderedPosition

        The rendered position about which zooming occurs, as an alternative to using the model position. This automatically modifies the pan such that the model position, corresponding to the rendered position at the start of the animation, remains at the same position in the viewport extent during zooming.

    • pan

      A panning position to which the graph will be animated.

    • panBy

      A relative panning position to which the graph will be animated.

    • fit

      An object containing fitting options from which the graph will be animated.

      • eles

        Elements or a selector to which the viewport will be fitted.

      • padding

        Padding to use with the fitting (default 0).

    • center

      An object containing centring options from which the graph will be animated.

      • eles

        Elements or a selector to which the viewport will be centred.

    • duration

      The duration of the animation in milliseconds.

    • queue

      A boolean indicating whether to queue the animation (default true). Queued animations on the core run in order until the queue is empty.

    • easing

      A transition-timing-function easing style string that shapes the animation progress curve.

    • complete

      A function to call when the animation is done.

    • step

      A function to call each time the animation steps.

Examples

Manual pan and zoom:

cy.animate({
  pan: { x: 100, y: 100 },
  zoom: 2
}, {
  duration: 1000
});

Fit to elements:

var j = cy.$('#j');

cy.animate({
  fit: {
    eles: j,
    padding: 20
  }
}, {
  duration: 1000
});
cy.animation()    

Get an animation of the viewport.

cy.animation( options )
  • options

    An object containing the details of the animation.

    • zoom

      A zoom level (number) or a zoom configuration object to which the graph will be animated.

      • level

        The zoom level to use.

      • position

        The position about which zooming occurs. This automatically modifies the pan such that the specified model position remains at the same position in the viewport extent during zooming.

      • renderedPosition

        The rendered position about which zooming occurs, as an alternative to using the model position. This automatically modifies the pan such that the model position, corresponding to the rendered position at the start of the animation, remains at the same position in the viewport extent during zooming.

    • pan

      A panning position to which the graph will be animated.

    • panBy

      A relative panning position to which the graph will be animated.

    • fit

      An object containing fitting options from which the graph will be animated.

      • eles

        Elements or a selector to which the viewport will be fitted.

      • padding

        Padding to use with the fitting (default 0).

    • center

      An object containing centring options from which the graph will be animated.

      • eles

        Elements or a selector to which the viewport will be centred.

    • duration

      The duration of the animation in milliseconds.

    • easing

      A transition-timing-function easing style string that shapes the animation progress curve.

    • complete

      A function to call when the animation is done.

    • step

      A function to call each time the animation steps.

cy.delay()    

Add a delay between queued animations for the viewport.

cy.delay( durationcomplete )
  • duration

    How long the delay should be in milliseconds.

  • complete

    A function to call when the delay is complete.

Examples

cy
  .animate({
    fit: { eles: '#j' }
  })

  .delay(1000)

  .animate({
    fit: { eles: '#e' }
  })
;
cy.delayAnimation()    

Get a delay animation of the viewport.

cy.delayAnimation( duration )
  • duration

    How long the delay should be in milliseconds.

cy.stop()    

Stop all viewport animations that are currently running.

cy.stop( clearQueuejumpToEnd )
  • clearQueue

    A boolean (default false), indicating whether the queue of animations should be emptied.

  • jumpToEnd

    A boolean (default false), indicating whether the currently-running animations should jump to their ends rather than just stopping midway.

Examples

cy.animate({
  fit: { eles: '#j' }
}, { duration: 2000 });

// stop in the middle
setTimeout(function(){
  cy.stop();
}, 1000);
cy.clearQueue()  

Remove all queued animations for the viewport.

Layout

cy.layout()        
Aliases: cy.createLayout(), cy.makeLayout(),

Get a new layout, which can be used to algorithmically position the nodes in the graph.

cy.layout( options )
  • options

    The layout options.

You must specify options.name with the name of the layout you wish to use.

This function creates and returns a layout object. You may want to keep a reference to the layout for more advanced usecases, such as running multiple layouts simultaneously.

Note that you must call layout.run() in order for it to affect the graph.

The layout includes all elements in the graph at the moment cy.layout() is called, as cy.layout() is equivalent to cy.elements().layout(). You can use eles.layout() to run a layout on a subset of the elements in the graph.

Examples

var layout = cy.layout({
  name: 'random'
});

layout.run();

Style

cy.style()      

Get the entry point to modify the visual style of the graph after initialisation.

cy.style()

Get the current style object.

cy.style( stylesheet )

Assign a new stylesheet to replace the existing one.

  • stylesheet

    Either a cytoscape.stylesheet() object, a string stylesheet, or a JSON stylesheet (the same formats accepted for options.style at initialisation).

Details

You can use this function to gain access to the visual style (stylesheet) after initialisation. This is useful if you need to change the entire stylesheet at runtime.

Set a new style by reference:

// here a string stylesheet is used, but you could also use json or a cytoscape.stylesheet() object
var stringStylesheet = 'node { background-color: cyan; }';
cy.style( stringStylesheet );

Set an entirely new style to the graph, specifying selectors and style properties via function calls:

cy.style()
  .resetToDefault() // start a fresh default stylesheet

  // and then define new styles
  .selector('node')
      .style('background-color', 'magenta')

  // ...

  .update() // indicate the end of your new stylesheet so that it can be updated on elements
;

Set a completely new stylesheet (without the default stylesheet as a base):

cy.style()
  .clear() // start a fresh stylesheet without even the default stylesheet

  // define all basic styles for node
  .selector('node')
    .style('background-color', 'magenta')

  // define all basic styles for edge
  .selector('edge')
      .style({
      'width': 3,
      'line-color': 'yellow'
    })

  // ...

  .update() // indicate the end of your new stylesheet so that it can be updated on elements
;

Add to the existing stylesheet:

cy.style()
  .selector('node')
    .style({
      'background-color': 'yellow'
    })

  .update() // indicate the end of your new stylesheet so that it can be updated on elements
;

Set the style from plain JSON:

cy.style()
  .fromJson([
    {
      selector: 'node',
      style: {
        'background-color': 'red'
      }
    }

    // , ...
  ])

  .update() // indicate the end of your new stylesheet so that it can be updated on elements
;

Set the style from a style string (that you would probably pull from a file on your server):

cy.style()
  .fromString('node { background-color: blue; }')

  .update() // update the elements in the graph with the new style
;

Get the current style as JSON:

var styleJson = cy.style().json();
var serializedJson = JSON.stringify( styleJson );

Export

cy.png()    

Export the current graph view as a PNG image.

cy.png( options )
  • options

    The export options.

    • output

      Whether the output should be 'base64uri' (default), 'base64', or 'blob'.

    • bg

      The background colour of the image (transparent by default).

    • full

      Whether to export the current viewport view (false, default) or the entire graph (true).

    • scale

      This value specifies a positive number that scales the size of the resultant image.

    • maxWidth

      Specifies the scale automatically in combination with maxHeight such that the resultant image is no wider than maxWidth.

    • maxHeight

      Specifies the scale automatically in combination with maxWidth such that the resultant image is no taller than maxHeight.

Details

By default, the export takes into account the current screen pixel density so that the image is of the same quality of the screen. If the maxWidth or maxHeight options are specified, then the screen pixel density is ignored so that the image can fit in the specified dimensions.

Examples

var png64 = cy.png();

// put the png data in an img tag
document.querySelector('#png-eg').setAttribute('src', png64);

Example image tag:

cy.jpg()      
Aliases: cy.jpeg(),

Export the current graph view as a JPG image.

cy.jpg( options )
  • options

    The export options.

    • output

      Whether the output should be 'base64uri' (default), 'base64', or 'blob'.

    • bg

      The background colour of the image (white by default).

    • full

      Whether to export the current viewport view (false, default) or the entire graph (true).

    • scale

      This value specifies a positive number that scales the size of the resultant image.

    • maxWidth

      Specifies the scale automatically in combination with maxHeight such that the resultant image is no wider than maxWidth.

    • maxHeight

      Specifies the scale automatically in combination with maxWidth such that the resultant image is no taller than maxHeight.

    • quality

      Specifies the quality of the image from 0 (low quality, low filesize) to 1 (high quality, high filesize). If not set, the browser's default quality value is used.

Details

By default, the export takes into account the current screen pixel density so that the image is of the same quality of the screen. If the maxWidth or maxHeight options are specified, then the screen pixel density is ignored so that the image can fit in the specified dimensions.

The JPEG format is lossy, whereas PNG is not. This means that cy.jpg() is useful for cases where filesize is more important than pixel-perfect images. JPEG compression will make your images (especially edge lines) blurry and distorted.

Examples

var jpg64 = cy.jpg();

// put the png data in an img tag
document.querySelector('#jpg-eg').setAttribute('src', jpg64);

Example image tag:

cy.json()      

Import or export the graph in the same JSON format used at initialisation.

cy.json( flatEles )

Export the graph as JSON.

  • flatEles

    Whether the resulant JSON should include the elements as a flat array (true) or as two keyed arrays by group (false, default).

cy.json( cyJson )

Import the graph as JSON, updating only the fields specified.

  • cyJson

    The object with the fields corresponding to the states that should be changed.

Details

This function returns the same object that is used for initialisation. You will find this function useful if you would like to save the entire state of the graph, either for your own purposes or for future restoration of that graph state.

This function can also be used to set graph state as in cy.json( cyJson ), where each field in cyJson is to be mutated in the graph. For each field defined in cyJson, cy is updated to match with the corresponding events emitted. This allows for declarative changes on the graph to be made.

For cy.json( cyJson ), all mutable initialisation options are supported.

When setting cy.json({ elements: ... })

  • the included elements are mutated as specified (i.e. as they would be by ele.json( eleJson )),
  • the included elements not in the graph are added, and
  • the not included elements are removed from the graph.

When setting cy.json({ style: ... })

  • the entire stylesheet is replaced, and
  • the style is recalculated for each element.

Updating the stylesheet is expensive. Similarly, it can potentially be expensive to update the existing elements for large graphs — as each element needs to be considered, and potentially each field per element. For elements, a much cheaper option is to selectively call ele.json(...) with only the fields that need to be updated.

Examples

console.log( cy.json() );
cy.json({
  zoom: 2
});

Collection

A collection contains a set of nodes and edges. Calling a function applies the function to all elements in the collection. When reading values from a collection, eles.data() for example, the value of the first element in the collection is returned. For example:

var weight = cy.nodes().data("weight");

console.log( cy.nodes()[0].data("weight") + ' == ' + weight ); // weight is the first ele's weight

You can ensure that you’re reading from the element you want by using a selector to narrow down the collection to one element (i.e. eles.size() === 1) or the eles.eq() function.

Graph manipulation

ele.cy()  

Get the core instance that owns the element.

eles.remove()  

Remove the elements from the graph, and return all elements removed by this call.

Details

This function removes the calling elements from the graph. The elements are not deleted — they still exist in memory — but they are no longer in the graph.

A removed element just exists to be added back to its originating core instance or some other core instance. It does not make sense to call functions, other than eles.restore(), on a removed element. A removed element merely exists in this limbo state so you can later add it back to some core instance.

Examples

Remove selected elements:

cy.$(':selected').remove();
ele.removed()  

Get whether the element has been removed from the graph.

ele.inside()  

Get whether the element is inside the graph (i.e. not removed).

eles.restore()  

Put removed elements back into the graph.

Details

This function puts back elements in the graph that have been removed. It will do nothing if the elements are already in the graph.

An element can not be restored if its ID is the same as an element already in the graph. You should specify an alternative ID for the element you want to add in that case.

Examples

// remove selected elements
var eles = cy.$(':selected').remove();

// ... then some time later put them back
eles.restore();
eles.clone()    
Aliases: eles.copy(),

Get a new collection containing clones (i.e. copies) of the elements in the calling collection.

eles.move() et al      

Replace the specified elements with copies that have been moved as specified (i.e. new source, target, or parent). The new elements are returned.

edges.move( location )

Change the source, target, or both source and target.

  • location

    Where the edges are moved. You can specify a new source, a new target, or both.

    • source

      The ID of the new source node.

    • target

      The ID of the new target node.

nodes.move( location )

Change the parent.

  • location

    Where the nodes are moved.

    • parent

      The ID of the new parent node (use null for no parent).

Details

Note that this function does not really move the elements. Instead, this function

  • gets JSON copies of the elements,
  • removes the original elements,
  • modifies the JSON copies as specified, and
  • adds new elements from the JSON copies and restores relationships (in the case of compound node descendants and connected edges).

This creates the same effect as though the elements have been moved while maintaining the correct semantics for a graph.

Because this function replaces the specified elements in the graph, you will need to update any references you are holding to the old elements in your code.

Examples

Move an edge:

var ej = cy.$('#ej');

ej = ej.move({
  target: 'g'
});

Events

eles.on()          
Aliases: eles.bind(), eles.listen(), eles.addListener(),

Listen to events that occur on the elements.

eles.on( events [selector]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A delegate selector to specify child elements for which the handler runs.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

Examples

cy.$('#j').on('tap', function(evt){
  console.log( 'tap ' + evt.target.id() );
});
eles.promiseOn()      
Aliases: eles.pon(),

Get a promise that is resolved the first time any of the elements emit any of the specified events.

eles.promiseOn( events [selector] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A selector to specify elements for which the handler is emitted.

Examples

cy.$('#j').pon('tap').then(function( event ){
  console.log('tap promise fulfilled');
});
eles.one()    

Add a listener that is called once per event per element.

eles.one( events [selector]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A delegate selector to specify child elements for which the handler runs.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

Details

For each event specified to this function, the handler function is triggered once per element. This is useful for one-off events that occur on each element in the calling collection once.

This function is a bit more complicated for compound nodes where a delegate selector has been specified: Note that the handler is called once per element in the calling collection, and the handler is triggered by matching descendant elements.

Examples

cy.$('node').one('tap', function(e){
  var ele = e.target;
  console.log('tapped ' + ele.id());
});
eles.once()    

Add a listener that is called once per event per collection.

eles.once( events [selector]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    A delegate selector to specify child elements for which the handler runs.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

Details

For each event specified to this function, the handler function is triggered once. This is useful for one-off events that occur on just one element in the calling collection.

Examples

cy.nodes().once('click', function(e){
  var ele = e.target;
  console.log('clicked ' + ele.id());
});
eles.removeListener()          
Aliases: eles.off(), eles.unbind(), eles.unlisten(),

Remove one or more listeners on the elements.

eles.removeListener( events [selector] [handler] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • selector [optional]

    The same delegate selector used to listen to the events.

  • handler [optional]

    A reference to the handler function to remove.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var handler = function(){ console.log('tap') };

// listen
j.on('tap', handler);

// listen with some other handler
j.on('tap', function(){
  console.log('some other handler');
});

j.emit('tap'); // 'tap' & 'some other handler'

// remove the renferenced listener handler
j.removeListener('tap', handler);

j.emit('tap'); // some other handler

// remove all tap listener handlers (including unnamed handler)
j.removeListener('tap');
eles.emit()      
Aliases: eles.trigger(),

Emit events on the elements.

eles.emit( events [extraParams] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names to emit.

  • extraParams [optional]

    An array of additional parameters to pass to the handler.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');

j.on('tap', function(){
  console.log('tap!!');
});

j.emit('tap'); // tap!!

Data

eles.data() et al            
Aliases: eles.attr(),

Read and write developer-defined data associated with the elements.

ele.data()

Get the entire data object.

ele.data( name )

Get a particular data field for the element.

  • name

    The name of the field to get.

ele.data( namevalue )

Set a particular data field for the element.

  • name

    The name of the field to set.

  • value

    The value to set for the field.

ele.data( obj )

Update multiple data fields at once via an object.

  • obj

    The object containing name-value pairs to update data fields.

Details

Only JSON-serialisable data may be put in ele.data(). For temporary data or non-serialisable data, use ele.scratch().

The following fields are immutable:

  • id : The id field is used to uniquely identify an element in the graph.
  • source & target : These fields define an edge’s relationship to nodes, and this relationship can not be changed after creation.
  • parent : The parent field defines the parent (compound) node.

Instead of modifying those fields, you can replace an element with a modified clone using ele.move().

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');

// set the weight field in data
j.data('weight', 60);

// set several fields at once
j.data({
  name: 'Jerry Jerry Dingleberry',
  height: 176
});

var weight = j.data('weight');
eles.removeData()        
Aliases: eles.removeAttr(),

Remove developer-defined data associated with the elements.

eles.removeData()

Removes all mutable data fields for the elements.

eles.removeData( names )

Removes the specified mutable data fields for the elements.

  • names

    A space-separated list of fields to delete.

Details

Using ele.removeData() sets the specified fields to undefined. This allows you to use a meaningful null value in your element data.

The following data fields are immutable, and so they can not be removed:

  • id : The id field is used to uniquely identify an element in the graph.
  • source & target : These fields define an edge’s relationship to nodes, and this relationship can not be changed after creation.
  • parent : The parent field defines the parent (compound) node.

Instead of modifying those fields, you can replace an element with a modified clone using ele.move().

ele.scratch()        
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Set or get scratchpad data, where temporary or non-JSON data can be stored. App-level scratchpad data should use namespaces prefixed with underscore, like '_foo'.

ele.scratch()

Get the entire scratchpad object for the element.

ele.scratch( namespace )

Get the scratchpad at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

ele.scratch( namespacevalue )

Set the scratchpad at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

  • value

    The value to set at the specified namespace.

Details

This function is useful for storing temporary, possibly non-JSON data. Extensions — like layouts, renderers, and so on — use ele.scratch() namespaced on their registered name. For example, an extension named foo would use the namespace 'foo'.

If you want to use this function for your own app-level data, you can prefix the namespaces you use by underscore to avoid collisions with extensions. For example, using ele.scratch('_foo') in your app will avoid collisions with an extension named foo.

This function is useful for associating non-JSON data to an element. Whereas data stored via ele.data() is included by ele.json(), data stored by ele.scratch() is not. This makes it easy to temporarily store unserialisable data.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');

// entire scratchpad:
// be careful, since you could clobber over someone else's namespace or forget to use one at all!
var fooScratch = j.scratch()._foo = {}; 
// ... now you can modify fooScratch all you want

// set namespaced scratchpad to ele:
// safer, recommended
var fooScratch = j.scratch('_foo', {});
// ... now you can modify fooScratch all you want

// get namespaced scratchpad from ele (assumes set before)
var fooScratch = j.scratch('_foo');
// ... now you can modify fooScratch all you want
ele.removeScratch()    
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Remove scratchpad data. You should remove scratchpad data only at your own namespaces.

ele.removeScratch( namespace )

Remove the scratchpad data at a particular namespace.

  • namespace

    A namespace string.

ele.id()  

A shortcut to get the ID of an element.

ele.json()      

Get or mutate the element's plain JavaScript object representation.

ele.json()

Get the element's JSON.

ele.json( eleJson )

Mutate the element's state as specified.

  • eleJson

    For each field in the object, the element's state is mutated as specified.

Details

This function returns the plain JSON representation of the element, the same format which is used at initialisation, in cy.add(), etc.

This function can also be used to set the element’s state using the plain JSON representation of the element. Each field specified in ele.json( eleJson ) is diffed against the element’s current state, the element is mutated accordingly, and the appropriate events are emitted. This can be used to declaratively modify elements.

Note that it is much faster to simply specify the diff-patch objects to ele.json(), e.g. ele.json({ data: { foo: 'bar' } }) only updates foo in data. This avoids the cost of diffs on unchanged fields, which is useful when making many calls to ele.json() for larger graphs.

Examples

Print the JSON for an element:

console.log( cy.$('#j').json() );

Make an element selected:

cy.$('#j').json({ selected: true });
eles.jsons()  

Get an array of the plain JavaScript object representation of all elements in the collection.

Details

This function returns the plain JSON representation of all elements in the collection, the same format which is used at initialisation, in cy.add(), etc.

Examples

console.log( cy.elements().jsons() );
ele.group()  

Get the group string that defines the type of the element.

Details

The group strings are 'nodes' for nodes and 'edges' for edges. In general, you should be using ele.isEdge() and ele.isNode() instead of ele.group().

ele.isNode()  

Get whether the element is a node.

ele.isEdge()  

Get whether the element is an edge.

edge.isLoop()  

Get whether the edge is a loop (i.e. same source and target).

edge.isSimple()  

Get whether the edge is simple (i.e. different source and target).

Metadata

node.degree() et al                      
node.degree( includeLoops )

Get the degree of a node.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

node.indegree( includeLoops )

Get the indegree of a node.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

node.outdegree( includeLoops )

Get the outdegree of a node.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.totalDegree( includeLoops )

Get the total degree of a collection of nodes.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.minDegree( includeLoops )

Get the minimum degree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.maxDegree( includeLoops )

Get the maximum degree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.minIndegree( includeLoops )

Get the minimum indegree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.maxIndegree( includeLoops )

Get the maximum indegree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.minOutdegree( includeLoops )

Get the minimum outdegree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

nodes.maxOutdegree( includeLoops )

Get the maximum outdegree of the nodes in the collection.

  • includeLoops

    A boolean, indicating whether loops are to be included in degree calculations.

Details

Degree : For a node, the degree is the number of edge connections it has. Each time a node is referenced as source or target of an edge in the graph, that counts as an edge connection.

Indegree : For a node, the indegree is the number of incoming edge connections it has. Each time a node is referred to as target of an edge in the graph, that counts as an incoming edge connection.

Outdegree : For a node, the outdegree is the number of outgoing edge connections it has. Each time a node is referred to as source of an edge in the graph, that counts as an outgoing edge connection.

Total degree : For a set of nodes, the total degree is the total number of edge connections to nodes in the set.

Position & dimensions

node.position()              
Aliases: node.modelPosition(), node.point(),

Get or set the model position of a node.

node.position()

Get the entire position object.

node.position( dimension )

Get the value of a specified position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to get.

node.position( dimensionvalue )

Set the value of a specified position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to set.

  • value

    The value to set to the dimension.

node.position( pos )

Set the position using name-value pairs in the specified object.

  • pos

    An object specifying name-value pairs representing dimensions to set.

Details

A position has two fields, x and y, that can take on numerical values.

Examples

// get x for j
var x = cy.$('#j').position('x');

// get the whole position for e
var pos = cy.$('#e').position();

// set y for j
cy.$('#j').position('y', 100);

// set multiple
cy.$('#e').position({
  x: 123,
  y: 200
});
nodes.shift()      

Shift the positions of the nodes by a given model position vector.

nodes.shift( dimensionvalue )

Shift the nodes by one of 'x' or 'y'.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to shift.

  • value

    The value to shift the dimension.

nodes.shift( pos )

Shift the nodes by a position vector.

  • pos

    An object specifying name-value pairs representing dimensions to shift.

Examples

cy.$('#j').shift({ x: 10, y: 20 });
nodes.positions()          
Aliases: nodes.modelPositions(), nodes.points(),

Set the model positions of several nodes with a function.

nodes.positions( function(ele, i) )

Set the positions via a function.

  • function(ele, i)

    A callback function that returns the position to set for each element.

    • ele

      The element being iterated over for which the function should return a position to set.

    • i

      The index of the element when iterating over the elements in the collection.

nodes.positions( pos )

Set positions for all nodes based on a single position object.

  • pos

    An object specifying name-value pairs representing dimensions to set.

Examples

cy.nodes().positions(function( node, i ){
  return {
    x: i * 100,
    y: 100
  };
});
node.renderedPosition()            
Aliases: node.renderedPoint(),

Get or set the rendered (on-screen) position of a node.

node.renderedPosition()

Get the entire rendered position object.

node.renderedPosition( dimension )

Get the value of a specified rendered position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to get.

node.renderedPosition( dimensionvalue )

Set the value of a specified rendered position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to set.

  • value

    The value to set to the dimension.

node.renderedPosition( pos )

Set the rendered position using name-value pairs in the specified object.

  • pos

    An object specifying name-value pairs representing dimensions to set.

node.relativePosition()            
Aliases: node.relativePoint(),

Get or set the model position of a node, relative to its compound parent.

node.relativePosition()

Get the entire relative position object.

node.relativePosition( dimension )

Get the value of a specified relative position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to get.

node.relativePosition( dimensionvalue )

Set the value of a specified relative position dimension.

  • dimension

    The position dimension to set.

  • value

    The value to set to the dimension.

node.relativePosition( pos )

Set the relative position using name-value pairs in the specified object.

  • pos

    An object specifying name-value pairs representing dimensions to set.

ele.width() et al          

Get the width of the element.

ele.width()

Get the width of the element in model dimensions.

ele.outerWidth()

Get the outer width of the element in model dimensions (includes width, padding, & border).

ele.renderedWidth()

Get the width of the element in rendered dimensions.

ele.renderedOuterWidth()

Get the outer width of the element in rendered dimensions (includes width, padding, & border) in rendered dimensions.

ele.height() et al          

Get the height of the element.

ele.height()

Get the height of the element in model dimensions.

ele.outerHeight()

Get the outer height of the element in model dimensions (includes height, padding, & border).

ele.renderedHeight()

Get the height of the element in rendered dimensions.

ele.renderedOuterHeight()

Get the outer height of the element in rendered dimensions (includes height, padding, & border) in rendered dimensions.

eles.boundingBox()        
Aliases: eles.boundingbox(), eles.bb(),

Get the bounding box of the elements (in model co-ordinates).

eles.boundingBox( options )

Get the bounding box of the elements in model co-ordinates.

  • options

    An object containing options for the function.

    • includeNodes

      A boolean indicating whether to include nodes in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeEdges

      A boolean indicating whether to include edges in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeLabels

      A boolean indicating whether to include labels in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeOverlays

      A boolean indicating whether to include overlays (such as the one which appears when a node is clicked) in the bounding box (default true).

Details

This function returns a plain object with the fields x1, x2, y1, y2, w, and h defined.

Note that the includeOverlays option necessarily includes the dimensions of the body of the element. So using includeOverlays: true with includeNodes: false, for example, does not make sense. The case where the includeOverlays option is only useful in getting the non-overlay dimensions of an element, e.g. { includeOverlays: false, includeNodes: true }.

eles.renderedBoundingBox()      
Aliases: eles.renderedBoundingbox(),

Get the rendered bounding box of the elements.

eles.renderedBoundingBox( options )

Get the bounding box of the elements in rendered co-ordinates.

  • options

    An object containing options for the function.

    • includeNodes

      A boolean indicating whether to include nodes in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeEdges

      A boolean indicating whether to include edges in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeLabels

      A boolean indicating whether to include labels in the bounding box (default true).

    • includeOverlays

      A boolean indicating whether to include overlays (such as the one which appears when a node is clicked) in the bounding box (default true).

Details

This function returns a plain object with the fields x1, x2, y1, y2, w, and h defined.

Note that the includeOverlays option necessarily includes the dimensions of the body of the element. So using includeOverlays: true with includeNodes: false, for example, does not make sense. The case where the includeOverlays option is only useful in getting the non-overlay dimensions of an element, e.g. { includeOverlays: false, includeNodes: true }.

node.grabbed()  

Get whether a node is currently grabbed, meaning the user has hold of the node.

node.grabbable()  

Get whether the user can grab a node.

nodes.grabify()  

Allow the user to grab the nodes.

Examples

cy.$('#j').grabify();
nodes.ungrabify()  

Disallow the user to grab the nodes.

Examples

cy.$('#j').ungrabify();
node.locked()  

Get whether a node is locked, meaning that its position can not be changed.

nodes.lock()  

Lock the nodes such that their positions can not be changed.

Examples

cy.$('#j').lock();
nodes.unlock()  

Unlock the nodes such that their positions can be changed.

Examples

cy.$('#j').unlock();
ele.active()  

Gets whether the element is active (e.g. on user tap, grab, etc).

Edge points

edge.controlPoints() et al      

Get an array of control point positions for a curve-style: bezier or curve-style: unbundled-bezier edge.

edge.controlPoints()

Get the control points in model co-ordinates.

edge.renderedControlPoints()

Get the control points in rendered co-ordinates.

Details

While the control points may be specified relatively in the CSS, this function returns the absolute model positions of the control points. The points are specified in the order of source-to-target direction.

This function works for bundled beziers, but it is not applicable to the middle, straight-line edge in the bundle.

The number of returned points for each curve style is as follows:

  • curve-style: bezier (simple edge) : 1 point for a single quadratic bezier
  • curve-style: bezier (loop) : 2 points for two quadratic beziers
  • curve-style: unbundled-bezier : n points for n quadratic beziers, as the number of control points is defined by control-point-distances and control-point-weights
edge.segmentPoints() et al      

Get an array of segment point positions (i.e. bend points) for a curve-style: segments edge.

edge.segmentPoints()

Get the segment points in model co-ordinates.

edge.renderedSegmentPoints()

Get the segment points in rendered co-ordinates.

Details

While the segment points may be specified relatively in the stylesheet, this function returns the absolute model positions of the segment points. The points are specified in the order of source-to-target direction.

edge.sourceEndpoint() et al      

Get the position of where the edge ends, towards the source node.

edge.sourceEndpoint()

Get the source endpoint in model co-ordinates.

edge.renderedSourceEndpoint()

Get the target endpoint in rendered co-ordinates.

edge.targetEndpoint() et al      

Get the position of where the edge ends, towards the target node.

edge.targetEndpoint()

Get the target endpoint in model co-ordinates.

edge.renderedTargetEndpoint()

Get the target endpoint in rendered co-ordinates.

edge.midpoint() et al      

Get the position of the midpoint of the edge.

edge.midpoint()

Get the midpoint in model co-ordinates.

edge.renderedMidpoint()

Get the midpoint in rendered co-ordinates.

Details

The midpoint is, by default, where the edge’s label is centred. It is also the position towards which mid arrows point.

For curve-style: unbundled-bezier edges, the midpoint is the middle extremum if the number of control points is odd.

For an even number of control points, the midpoint is where the two middle-most control points meet. This is the middle inflection point for bilaterally symmetric or skew symmetric edges, for example.

For curve-style: segments edges, the midpoint is the middle segment point if the number of segment points is odd. For an even number of segment points, the overall midpoint is the midpoint of the middle-most line segment (i.e. the mean of the middle two segment points).

Layout

eles.layout()        
Aliases: eles.createLayout(), eles.makeLayout(),

Get a new layout, which can be used to algorithmically position the nodes in the collection.

eles.layout( options )
  • options

    The layout options.

This function is useful for running a layout on a subset of the elements in the graph, perhaps in parallel to other layouts.

You must specify options.name with the name of the layout you wish to use.

This function creates and returns a layout object. You may want to keep a reference to the layout for more advanced usecases, such as running multiple layouts simultaneously.

Note that you must call layout.run() in order for it to affect the graph.

Examples

var layout = cy.elements().layout({
  name: 'random'
});

layout.run();
nodes.layoutPositions()    
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Position the nodes for a discrete/synchronous layout.

nodes.layoutPositions( layoutoptionsfunction(ele, i) )
  • layout

    The layout.

  • options

    The layout options object.

  • function(ele, i)

    A function that returns the new position for the specified node.

    • ele

      The node being iterated over for which the function should return a position to set.

    • i

      The index of the current node while iterating over the nodes in the layout.

This function is intended to be used only by layout extensions. Your app should not call this function directly.

This function is called by discrete (synchronous) layouts to update the graph with new node positions.

A discrete layout is only responsible for calculating new node positions. Setting these positions and performing animations, modifying the viewport, changing zoom level, etc. are handled by layoutPositions() — which is called by each layout at the end of its run() method.

The options object is passed to layoutPositions() when called by a layout extension and consists of many of the common properties shared between layouts:

var options = {
  animate: false, // whether to animate changes to the layout
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms, if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation, if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.
    // All nodes animated by default for `animate:true`.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts.
  eles: someCollection, // collection of elements involved in the layout; set by cy.layout() or eles.layout()
  fit: true, // whether to fit the viewport to the graph
  padding: 30, // padding to leave between graph and viewport
  pan: undefined, // pan the graph to the provided position, given as { x, y }
  ready: undefined, // callback for the layoutready event
  stop: undefined, // callback for the layoutstop event
  spacingFactor: 1, // a positive value which adjusts spacing between nodes (>1 means greater than usual spacing)
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts
  zoom: undefined // zoom level as a positive number to set after animation
}

Note that if fit is true, it will override any values provided in pan or zoom.

node.layoutDimensions()    
Extension function: This function is intended for use in extensions.

Get the node width and height. This function is intended for use in layout positioning to do overlap detection.

node.layoutDimensions( options )
  • options

    The layout options object.

This function is used to retrieve the width and height of the bounding box of a node. The way the width and height are calculated is affected by the options object.

This function returns an object containing the width and height of the calculated bounding box under the w and h keys respectively. It can be used as a direct replacement for the boundingBox() function assuming only w and h values are needed.

var options = {
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: true // boolean which changes whether label dimensions are included when calculating node dimensions, default true
};

var dims = cy.nodes().first().layoutDimensions( options );

Selection

ele.selected()  

Get whether the element is selected.

eles.select()  

Make the elements selected. Elements outside the collection are not affected.

Examples

cy.$('#j').select();
eles.unselect()    
Aliases: eles.deselect(),

Make the elements not selected. Elements outside the collection are not affected.

Examples

cy.$('#j').unselect();
ele.selectable()  

Get whether the element's selection state is mutable.

eles.selectify()  

Make the selection states of the elements mutable.

Examples

cy.$('#j').unselectify();
eles.unselectify()  

Make the selection states of the elements immutable.

Examples

cy.$('#j').unselectify();

Style

eles.addClass()    

Add classes to elements. The classes should be specified in the stylesheet in order to have an effect on the rendered style of the elements.

eles.addClass( classes )
  • classes

    An array (or a space-separated string) of class names to add to the elements.

Examples

cy.$('#j, #e').addClass('foo');
eles.removeClass()    

Remove classes from elements. The classes should be specified in the stylesheet in order to have an effect on the rendered style of the elements.

eles.removeClass( classes )
  • classes

    An array (or a space-separated string) of class names to remove from the elements.

Examples

cy.$('#j, #e').removeClass('foo');
eles.toggleClass()    

Toggle whether the elements have the specified classes. The classes should be specified in the stylesheet in order to have an effect on the rendered style of the elements.

eles.toggleClass( classes [toggle] )
  • classes

    An array (or a space-separated string) of class names to toggle on the elements.

  • toggle [optional]

    Instead of automatically toggling, adds the classes on truthy values or removes them on falsey values.

Examples

Toggle:

cy.$('#j, #e').toggleClass('foo');

Toggle on:

cy.$('#j, #e').toggleClass('foo', true);

Toggle off:

cy.$('#j, #e').toggleClass('foo', false);
eles.classes()    

Replace the current list of classes on the elements with the specified list.

eles.classes( classes )
  • classes

    An array (or a space-separated string) of class names that replaces the current class list.

Examples

Remove all classes:

cy.nodes().classes(); // no classes

Replace classes:

cy.nodes().classes('foo');
eles.flashClass()    

Add classes to the elements, and then remove the classes after a specified duration.

eles.flashClass( classes [duration] )
  • classes

    An array (or a space-separated string) of class names to flash on the elements.

  • duration [optional]

    The duration in milliseconds that the classes should be added on the elements. After the duration, the classes are removed.

Examples

cy.$('#j, #e').flashClass('foo', 1000);
ele.hasClass()    

Get whether an element has a particular class.

ele.hasClass( className )
  • className

    The name of the class to test for.

Examples

console.log( 'j has class `foo` : '  + cy.$('#j').hasClass('foo') );
eles.style() et al                
Aliases: eles.css(),

Get or override the style of the element.

ele.style()

Get a name-value pair object containing visual style properties and their values for the element.

ele.style( name )

Get a particular style property value.

  • name

    The name of the visual style property to get.

eles.style( namevalue )

Set a particular style property value.

  • name

    The name of the visual style property to set.

  • value

    The value of the visual style property to set.

eles.style( obj )

Set several particular style property values.

  • obj

    An object of style property name-value pairs to set.

eles.removeStyle()

Remove all style overrides.

eles.removeStyle( names )

Remove specific style overrides.

  • names

    A space-separated list of property names to remove overrides.

Details

You should use this function very sparingly for setting:

  • There are very few valid usecases for setting with ele.style().
  • It overrides the style of an element, despite the state and classes that it has.
  • In general, it’s much better to specify a better stylesheet at initialisation that reflects your application state rather than programmatically modifying style.
  • You can not serialise or deserialise overridden style via ele.json().

Only defined visual style properties are supported.

If you would like to remove a particular overridden style property, you can set null or '' (the empty string) to it.

ele.numericStyle()    

Get the numeric value of a style property in preferred units that can be used for calculations.

ele.numericStyle( name )
  • name

    The name of the style property to get.

Details

  • Sizes (e.g. width) are in model pixels.
  • Times (e.g. transition-duration) are in milliseconds.
  • Angles (e.g. text-rotation) are in radians.
  • Plain numbers (e.g. opacity) are unitless.
  • Colours (e.g. background-color) are in [r, g, b] arrays with values on [0, 255].
  • Lists of numbers (e.g. edge-distances) are in arrays.
  • Percents range on [0, 1] so that they are useful for calculations.
  • Some properties can not have preferred units defined, like background-position-x — it could be in px or %, for instance. A property like this is returned in the units as specified in the element’s style (e.g. the stylesheet). In this case, the units can be returned explicitly via ele.numericStyleUnits().
  • Values that can not be expressed as numbers (e.g. label) are returned as a string.

Examples

node.numericStyle('width') would return 30 for a 30px wide node, even if the node was specified as width: 3em.

ele.numericStyleUnits()    

Get the units that ele.numericStyle() is expressed in, for a particular property.

ele.numericStyleUnits( name )
  • name

    The name of the style property to get.

ele.visible() et al      

Get whether the element is visible (i.e. display: element and visibility: visible).

ele.visible()

Get whether the element is visible.

ele.hidden()

Get whether the element is hidden.

ele.effectiveOpacity()  

Get the effective opacity of the element (i.e. on-screen opacity), which takes into consideration parent node opacity.

ele.transparent()  

Get whether the element's effective opacity is completely transparent, which takes into consideration parent node opacity.

Animation

ele.animated()  

Get whether the element is currently being animated.

eles.animate()    

Animate the elements.

eles.animate( options )
  • options

    An object containing the details of the animation.

    • position

      A position to which the elements will be animated.

    • renderedPosition

      A rendered position to which the elements will be animated.

    • style

      An object containing name-value pairs of style properties to animate.

    • duration

      The duration of the animation in milliseconds.

    • queue

      A boolean indicating whether to queue the animation (default true).

    • easing

      A transition-timing-function easing style string that shapes the animation progress curve.

    • complete

      A function to call when the animation is done.

    • step

      A function to call each time the animation steps.

Details

Note that you can specify only one of position and renderedPosition: You can not animate to two positions at once.

Examples

cy.nodes().animate({
  position: { x: 100, y: 100 },
  style: { backgroundColor: 'red' }
}, {
  duration: 1000
});

console.log('Animating nodes...');
ele.animation()    

Get an animation for the element.

ele.animation( options )
  • options

    An object containing the details of the animation.

    • position

      A position to which the elements will be animated.

    • renderedPosition

      A rendered position to which the elements will be animated.

    • style

      An object containing name-value pairs of style properties to animate.

    • duration

      The duration of the animation in milliseconds.

    • easing

      A transition-timing-function easing style string that shapes the animation progress curve.

    • complete

      A function to call when the animation is done.

    • step

      A function to call each time the animation steps.

eles.delay()    

Add a delay between queued animations for the elements.

eles.delay( durationcomplete )
  • duration

    How long the delay should be in milliseconds.

  • complete

    A function to call when the delay is complete.

Examples

cy.nodes()
  .animate({
      style: { 'background-color': 'blue' }
    }, {
      duration: 1000
    })

  .delay( 1000 )

  .animate({
    style: { 'background-color': 'yellow' }
  })
;

console.log('Animating nodes...');
ele.delayAnimation()    

Get a delay animation for the element.

ele.delayAnimation( duration )
  • duration

    How long the delay should be in milliseconds.

eles.stop()    

Stop all animations that are currently running.

eles.stop( clearQueuejumpToEnd )
  • clearQueue

    A boolean, indicating whether the queue of animations should be emptied.

  • jumpToEnd

    A boolean, indicating whether the currently-running animations should jump to their ends rather than just stopping midway.

Examples

cy.nodes().animate({
  style: { 'background-color': 'cyan' }
}, {
  duration: 5000,
  complete: function(){
    console.log('Animation complete');
  }
});

console.log('Animating nodes...');

setTimeout(function(){
  console.log('Stopping nodes animation');
  cy.nodes().stop();
}, 2500);
eles.clearQueue()  

Remove all queued animations for the elements.

Comparison

eles.same()    

Determine whether this collection contains exactly the same elements as another collection.

eles.same( eles )
  • eles

    The other elements to compare to.

Examples

var heavies = cy.$('node[weight > 60]');
var guys = cy.$('#j, #g, #k');

console.log( 'same ? ' + heavies.same(guys) );
eles.anySame()    

Determine whether this collection contains any of the same elements as another collection.

eles.anySame( eles )
  • eles

    The other elements to compare to.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var guys = cy.$('#j, #g, #k');

console.log( 'any same ? ' + j.anySame(guys) );
eles.contains()      
Aliases: eles.has(),

Determine whether this collection contains all of the elements of another collection.

eles.contains( eles )
  • eles

    The other elements to compare to.

Examples

cy.$('#j, #e').contains( cy.$('#j') ); // true
eles.allAreNeighbors()      
Aliases: eles.allAreNeighbours(),

Determine whether all elements in the specified collection are in the neighbourhood of the calling collection.

eles.allAreNeighbors( eles )
  • eles

    The other elements to compare to.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var gAndK = cy.$('#g, #k');

console.log( 'all neighbours ? ' + j.allAreNeighbors(gAndK) );
eles.is()    

Determine whether any element in this collection matches a selector.

eles.is( selector )
  • selector

    The selector to match against.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');

console.log( 'j has weight > 50 ? ' + j.is('[weight > 50]') );
eles.allAre()    

Determine whether all elements in the collection match a selector.

eles.allAre( selector )
  • selector

    The selector to match against.

Examples

var jAndE = cy.$('#j, #e');

console.log( 'j and e all have weight > 50 ? ' + jAndE.allAre('[weight > 50]') );
eles.some()    

Determine whether any element in this collection satisfies the specified test function.

eles.some( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The test function that returns truthy values for elements that satisfy the test and falsey values for elements that do not satisfy the test.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being tested.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the test function.

Examples

var jAndE = cy.$('#j, #e');
var someHeavierThan50 = jAndE.some(function( ele ){
  return ele.data('weight') > 50;
});

console.log( 'some heavier than 50 ? ' + someHeavierThan50 );
eles.every()    

Determine whether all elements in this collection satisfy the specified test function.

eles.every( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The test function that returns truthy values for elements that satisfy the test and falsey values for elements that do not satisfy the test.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being tested.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the test function.

Examples

var jAndE = cy.$('#j, #e');
var everyHeavierThan50 = jAndE.every(function( ele ){
  return ele.data('weight') > 50;
});

console.log( 'every heavier than 50 ? ' + everyHeavierThan50 );

Iteration

eles.size()  

Get the number of elements in the collection.

Details

Note that as an alternative, you may read eles.length instead of eles.size(). The two are interchangeable.

eles.empty() et al      

Get whether the collection is empty, meaning it has no elements.

eles.empty()

Get whether the collection is empty.

eles.nonempty()

Get whether the collection is nonempty.

eles.forEach()      
Aliases: eles.each(),

Iterate over the elements in the collection.

eles.forEach( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The function executed each iteration.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being iterated.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the iterating function.

Details

This function behaves like Array.prototype.forEach() with minor changes for convenience:

  • You can exit the iteration early by returning false in the iterating function. The Array.prototype.forEach() implementation does not support this, but it is included anyway on account of its utility.

Examples

// print all the ids of the nodes in the graph
cy.nodes().forEach(function( ele ){
  console.log( ele.id() );
});
eles.eq() et al        

Get an element at a particular index in the collection.

eles.eq( index )
  • index

    The index of the element to get.

eles.first()

Get the first element in the collection.

eles.last()

Get the last element in the collection.

Details

You may use eles[i] in place of eles.eq(i) as a more performant alternative.

eles.slice()    

Get a subset of the elements in the collection based on specified indices.

eles.slice( [start] [end] )
  • start [optional]

    An integer that specifies where to start the selection. The first element has an index of 0. Use negative numbers to select from the end of an array.

  • end [optional]

    An integer that specifies where to end the selection. If omitted, all elements from the start position and to the end of the array will be selected. Use negative numbers to select from the end of an array.

eles.toArray()  

Get the collection as an array, maintaining the order of the elements.

Building & filtering

eles.getElementById()      
Aliases: eles.$id(),

Get an element in the collection from its ID in a very performant way.

eles.getElementById( id )
  • id

    The ID of the element to get.

eles.union()                
Aliases: eles.add(), eles.or(), eles['u'](), eles['+'](), eles['|'](),

Get a new collection, resulting from adding the collection with another one

eles.union( eles )
  • eles

    The elements to add.

eles.union( selector )
  • selector

    Elements in the graph matching this selector are added.

Examples

With a collection:

var j = cy.$('#j');
var e = cy.$('#e');

j.union(e);

With a selector:

cy.$('#j').union('#e');
eles.difference()                  
Aliases: eles.not(), eles.subtract(), eles.relativeComplement(), eles['\\'](), eles['!'](), eles['-'](),

Get a new collection, resulting from the collection without some specified elements.

eles.difference( eles )
  • eles

    The elements that will not be in the resultant collection.

eles.difference( selector )
  • selector

    Elements from the calling collection matching this selector will not be in the resultant collection.

Examples

With a collection:

var j = cy.$('#j');
var nodes = cy.nodes();

nodes.difference(j);

With a selector:

cy.nodes().difference('#j');
eles.absoluteComplement()      
Aliases: eles.abscomp(), eles.complement(),

Get all elements in the graph that are not in the calling collection.

Examples

cy.$('#j').absoluteComplement();
eles.intersection()                
Aliases: eles.intersect(), eles.and(), eles['n'](), eles['&'](), eles['.'](),

Get the elements in both this collection and another specified collection.

eles.intersection( eles )
  • eles

    The elements to intersect with.

eles.intersection( selector )
  • selector

    A selector representing the elements to intersect with. All elements in the graph matching the selector are used as the passed collection.

Examples

var jNhd = cy.$('#j').neighborhood();
var eNhd = cy.$('#e').neighborhood();

jNhd.intersection( eNhd );
eles.symmetricDifference()                
Aliases: eles.symdiff(), eles.xor(), eles['^'](), eles['(+)'](), eles['(-)'](),

Get the elements that are in the calling collection or the passed collection but not in both.

eles.symmetricDifference( eles )
  • eles

    The elements to apply the symmetric difference with.

eles.symmetricDifference( selector )
  • selector

    A selector representing the elements to apply the symmetric difference with. All elements in the graph matching the selector are used as the passed collection.

Examples

cy.$('#j, #e, #k').symdiff('#j, #g');
eles.diff()      

Perform a traditional left/right diff on the two collections.

eles.diff( eles )
  • eles

    The elements on the right side of the diff.

eles.diff( selector )
  • selector

    A selector representing the elements on the right side of the diff. All elements in the graph matching the selector are used as the passed collection.

Details

This function returns a plain object of the form { left, right, both } where

  • left is the set of elements only in the calling (i.e. left) collection,
  • right is the set of elements only in the passed (i.e. right) collection, and
  • both is the set of elements in both collections.

Examples

var diff = cy.$('#j, #e, #k').diff('#j, #g');
var getNodeId = function( n ){ return n.id() };

console.log( 'left: ' + diff.left.map( getNodeId ).join(', ') );
console.log( 'right: ' + diff.right.map( getNodeId ).join(', ') );
console.log( 'both: ' + diff.both.map( getNodeId ).join(', ') );
eles.merge()      

Perform a in-place merge of the given elements into the calling collection.

eles.merge( eles )
  • eles

    The elements to merge in-place.

eles.merge( selector )
  • selector

    A selector representing the elements to merge. All elements in the graph matching the selector are used as the passed collection.

Details

This function modifies the calling collection instead of returning a new one. Use of this function should be considered for performance in some cases, but otherwise should be avoided. Consider using eles.union() instead.

Use this function only on new collections that you create yourself, using cy.collection(). This ensures that you do not unintentionally modify another collection.

Examples

With a collection:

var col = cy.collection(); // new, empty collection
var j = cy.$('#j');
var e = cy.$('#e');

col.merge( j ).merge( e );

With a selector:

var col = cy.collection(); // new, empty collection

col.merge('#j').merge('#e');
eles.unmerge()      

Perform an in-place operation on the calling collection to remove the given elements.

eles.unmerge( eles )
  • eles

    The elements to remove in-place.

eles.unmerge( selector )
  • selector

    A selector representing the elements to remove. All elements in the graph matching the selector are used as the passed collection.

Details

This function modifies the calling collection instead of returning a new one. Use of this function should be considered for performance in some cases, but otherwise should be avoided. Consider using eles.filter() or eles.remove() instead.

Use this function only on new collections that you create yourself, using cy.collection(). This ensures that you do not unintentionally modify another collection.

Examples

With a collection:

var col = cy.collection(); // new, empty collection
var e = cy.$('#e');

col.merge( cy.nodes() );

col.unmerge( e );

With a selector:

var col = cy.collection(); // new, empty collection

col.merge( cy.nodes() );

col.unmerge('#e');
eles.filter() et al          

Get a new collection containing elements that are accepted by the specified filter function or selector.

eles.filter( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The filter function that returns truthy values for elements to include and falsey values for elements to exclude.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being filtered.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the iterating function.

eles.filter( selector )

Get the elements that match the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector to match against.

eles.nodes( selector )

Get the nodes that match the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector to match against.

eles.edges( selector )

Get the edges that match the specified selector.

  • selector

    The selector to match against.

Examples

With a selector:

cy.nodes().filter('[weight > 50]');

With a function:

cy.nodes().filter(function( ele ){
  return ele.data('weight') > 50;
});
eles.sort()    

Get a new collection containing the elements sorted by the specified comparison function.

eles.sort( function(ele1, ele2) )
  • function(ele1, ele2)

    The sorting comparison function that returns a negative number for ele1 before ele2, 0 for ele1 same as ele2, or a positive number for ele1 after ele2.

Examples

Get collection of nodes in order of increasing weight:

var nodes = cy.nodes().sort(function( a, b ){
  return a.data('weight') - b.data('weight');
});

// show order via animations
var duration = 1000;
nodes.removeStyle().forEach(function( node, i ){
  node.delay( i * duration ).animate({
    style: {
      'border-width': 4,
      'border-color': 'green'
    }
  }, { duration: duration });
});

console.log('Animating nodes to show sorted order');
eles.map()    

Get an array containing values mapped from the collection.

eles.map( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The function that returns the mapped value for each element.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being mapped.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the iterating function.

Examples

Get an array of node weights:

var weights = cy.nodes().map(function( ele ){
  return ele.data('weight');
});

console.log(weights);
eles.reduce()    

Reduce a single value by applying a function against an accumulator and each value of the collection.

eles.reduce( function(prevVal, ele, i, eles) )
  • function(prevVal, ele, i, eles)

    The function that returns the accumulated value given the previous value and the current element.

    • prevVal

      The value accumulated from previous elements.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being reduced.

Examples

Join the node IDs into a comma-separated string:

var initialValue = null;
var fn = function( prevVal, ele, i, eles ){
  if( prevVal ){
    return prevVal + ',' + ele.id();
  } else {
    return ele.id();
  }
};
var ids = cy.nodes().reduce( fn, initialValue );

console.log( ids );
eles.min()    

Find a minimum value in a collection.

eles.min( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The function that returns the value to compare for each element.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being searched.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the iterating function.

Details

This function returns an object with the following fields:

  • value : The minimum value found.
  • ele : The element that corresponds to the minimum value.

Examples

Find the node with the minimum weight:

var min = cy.nodes().min(function(){
  return this.data('weight');
});

console.log( 'min val: ' + min.value + ' for element ' + min.ele.id() );
eles.max()    

Find a maximum value and the corresponding element.

eles.max( function(ele, i, eles) [thisArg] )
  • function(ele, i, eles)

    The function that returns the value to compare for each element.

    • ele

      The current element.

    • i

      The index of the current element.

    • eles

      The collection of elements being searched.

  • thisArg [optional]

    The value for this within the iterating function.

Details

This function returns an object with the following fields:

  • value : The maximum value found.
  • ele : The element that corresponds to the maximum value.

Examples

Find the node with the maximum weight:

var max = cy.nodes().max(function(){
  return this.data('weight');
});

console.log( 'max val: ' + max.value + ' for element ' + max.ele.id() );

Traversing

eles.neighborhood() et al        

Get the neighbourhood of the elements.

eles.neighborhood( [selector] )
Aliases: eles.neighbourhood(),

Get the open neighbourhood of the elements.

  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

eles.openNeighborhood( [selector] )
Aliases: eles.openNeighbourhood(),

Get the open neighbourhood of the elements.

  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

eles.closedNeighborhood( [selector] )
Aliases: eles.closedNeighbourhood(),

Get the closed neighbourhood of the elements.

  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Details

The neighbourhood returned by this function is a bit different than the traditional definition of a “neighbourhood”: This returned neighbourhood includes the edges connecting the collection to the neighbourhood. This gives you more flexibility.

An open neighbourhood is one that does not include the original set of elements. If unspecified, a neighbourhood is open by default.

A closed neighbourhood is one that does include the original set of elements.

Examples

cy.$('#j').neighborhood();
eles.components()  

Get the connected components, considering only the elements in the calling collection. An array of collections is returned, with each collection representing a component.

nodes.edgesWith()      

Get the edges connecting the collection to another collection. Direction of the edges does not matter.

nodes.edgesWith( eles )
  • eles

    The other collection.

nodes.edgesWith( selector )
  • selector

    The other collection, specified as a selector which is matched against all elements in the graph.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var e = cy.$('#e');

j.edgesWith(e);
nodes.edgesTo()      

Get the edges coming from the collection (i.e. the source) going to another collection (i.e. the target).

nodes.edgesTo( eles )
  • eles

    The other collection.

nodes.edgesTo( selector )
  • selector

    The other collection, specified as a selector which is matched against all elements in the graph.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var e = cy.$('#e');

j.edgesTo(e);
edges.connectedNodes()    

Get the nodes connected to the edges in the collection.

edges.connectedNodes( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var je = cy.$('#je');

je.connectedNodes();
nodes.connectedEdges()    

Get the edges connected to the nodes in the collection.

nodes.connectedEdges( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');

j.connectedEdges();
edge.source()    

Get source node of this edge.

edge.source( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var je = cy.$('#je');

je.source();
edges.sources()    

Get source nodes connected to the edges in the collection.

edges.sources( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var edges = cy.$('#je, #kg');

edges.sources();
edge.target()    

Get target node of this edge.

edge.target( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var je = cy.$('#je');

je.target();
edges.targets()    

Get target nodes connected to the edges in the collection.

edges.targets( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

var edges = cy.$('#je, #kg');

edges.targets();
edges.parallelEdges()    

Get edges parallel to those in the collection.

edges.parallelEdges( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Details

Two edges are said to be parallel if they connect the same two nodes. Any two parallel edges may connect nodes in the same direction, in which case the edges share the same source and target. They may alternatively connect nodes in the opposite direction, in which case the source and target are reversed in the second edge.

Examples

cy.$('#je').parallelEdges();
edges.codirectedEdges()    

Get edges codirected to those in the collection.

edges.codirectedEdges( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Details

Two edges are said to be codirected if they connect the same two nodes in the same direction: The edges have the same source and target.

Examples

cy.$('#je').codirectedEdges(); // only self in this case
nodes.roots()    

From the set of calling nodes, get the nodes which are roots (i.e. no incoming edges, as in a directed acyclic graph).

nodes.roots( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.leaves()    

From the set of calling nodes, get the nodes which are leaves (i.e. no outgoing edges, as in a directed acyclic graph).

nodes.leaves( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.outgoers()    

Get edges (and their targets) coming out of the nodes in the collection.

nodes.outgoers( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

Get outgoers of j:

cy.$('#j').outgoers();
nodes.successors()    

Recursively get edges (and their targets) coming out of the nodes in the collection (i.e. the outgoers, the outgoers' outgoers, ...).

nodes.successors( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

Get successors of j:

cy.$('#j').successors();
nodes.incomers()    

Get edges (and their sources) coming into the nodes in the collection.

nodes.incomers( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

Get incomers of j:

cy.$('#j').incomers();
nodes.predecessors()    

Recursively get edges (and their sources) coming into the nodes in the collection (i.e. the incomers, the incomers' incomers, ...).

nodes.predecessors( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    An optional selector that is used to filter the resultant collection.

Examples

Get predecessors of j:

cy.$('#j').predecessors();

Search

eles.breadthFirstSearch()      
Aliases: eles.bfs(),

Perform a breadth-first search within the elements in the collection.

eles.breadthFirstSearch( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root nodes (selector or collection) to start the search from.

    • visit: function(v, e, u, i, depth) [optional]

      A handler function that is called when a node is visited in the search. The handler returns true when it finds the desired node, and it returns false to cancel the search.

      • v

        The current node.

      • e

        The edge connecting the previous node to the current node.

      • u

        The previous node.

      • i

        The index indicating this node is the ith visited node.

      • depth

        How many edge hops away this node is from the root nodes.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

Note that this function performs a breadth-first search on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

This function returns an object that contains two collections ({ path: eles, found: node }), the node found by the search and the path of the search:

  • If no node was found, then found is empty.
  • If your handler function returns false, then the only the path up to that point is returned.
  • The path returned includes edges such that if path[i] is a node, then path[i - 1] is the edge used to get to that node.

Examples

var bfs = cy.elements().bfs({
  roots: '#e',
  visit: function(v, e, u, i, depth){
    console.log( 'visit ' + v.id() );

    // example of finding desired node
    if( v.data('weight') > 70 ){
      return true;
    }

    // example of exiting search early
    if( v.data('weight') < 0 ){
      return false;
    }
  },
  directed: false
});

var path = bfs.path; // path to found node
var found = bfs.found; // found node

// select the path
path.select();
eles.depthFirstSearch()      
Aliases: eles.dfs(),

Perform a depth-first search within the elements in the collection.

eles.depthFirstSearch( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root nodes (selector or collection) to start the search from.

    • visit: function(v, e, u, i, depth) [optional]

      A handler function that is called when a node is visited in the search. The handler returns true when it finds the desired node, and it returns false to cancel the search.

      • v

        The current node.

      • e

        The edge connecting the previous node to the current node.

      • u

        The previous node.

      • i

        The index indicating this node is the ith visited node.

      • depth

        How many edge hops away this node is from the root nodes.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

Note that this function performs a depth-first search on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

This function returns an object that contains two collections ({ path: eles, found: node }), the node found by the search and the path of the search:

  • If no node was found, then found is empty.
  • If your handler function returns false, then the only the path up to that point is returned.
  • The path returned includes edges such that if path[i] is a node, then path[i - 1] is the edge used to get to that node.

Examples

var dfs = cy.elements().dfs({
  roots: '#e',
  visit: function(v, e, u, i, depth){
    console.log( 'visit ' + v.id() );

    // example of finding desired node
    if( v.data('weight') > 70 ){
      return true;
    }

    // example of exiting search early
    if( v.data('weight') < 0 ){
      return false;
    }
  },
  directed: false
});

var path = dfs.path; // path to found node
var found = dfs.found; // found node

// select the path
path.select();
eles.dijkstra()    

Perform Dijkstra's algorithm on the elements in the collection. This finds the shortest paths to all other nodes in the collection from the root node.

eles.dijkstra( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root node (selector or collection) where the algorithm starts.

    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the positive numeric weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

Note that this function performs Dijkstra’s algorithm on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  distanceTo: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
  pathTo: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
}

distanceTo(node) returns the distance from the source node to node, and pathTo(node) returns a collection containing the shortest path from the source node to node. The path starts with the source node and includes the edges between the nodes in the path such that if pathTo(node)[i] is an edge, then pathTo(node)[i-1] is the previous node in the path and pathTo(node)[i+1] is the next node in the path.

If no weight function is defined, a constant weight of 1 is used for each edge.

Examples

var dijkstra = cy.elements().dijkstra('#e', function(edge){
  return edge.data('weight');
});

var pathToJ = dijkstra.pathTo( cy.$('#j') );
var distToJ = dijkstra.distanceTo( cy.$('#j') );
eles.aStar()    

Perform the A* search algorithm on the elements in the collection. This finds the shortest path from the root node to the goal node.

eles.aStar( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root node (selector or collection) where the search starts.

    • goal

      The goal node (selector or collection) where the search ends.

    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the positive numeric weight for the edge.

    • heuristic: function(node) [optional]

      A function that returns an estimation (cannot be overestimation) on the shortest distance from the current node to the goal.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

Note that this function performs A* search on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  found, /* true or false */
  distance, /* Distance of the shortest path, if found */
  path /* Ordered collection of elements in the shortest path, if found */
}

Regarding optional options:

  • If no weight function is defined, a constant weight of 1 is used for each edge.
  • If no heuristic function is provided, a constant null function will be used, turning this into the same behaviour as Dijkstra’s algorithm. The heuristic should be monotonic (also called consistent) in addition to being ‘admissible’.

Examples

var aStar = cy.elements().aStar({ root: "#j", goal: "#e" });

aStar.path.select();
eles.floydWarshall()    

Perform the Floyd-Warshall search algorithm on the elements in the collection. This finds the shortest path between all pairs of nodes.

eles.floydWarshall( options )
  • options
    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the positive numeric weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  /* function that computes the shortest path between 2 nodes 
  (either objects or selector strings) */
  path: function( fromNode, toNode ){ /* impl */ }, 

  /* function that computes the shortest distance between 2 nodes 
  (either objects or selector strings) */
  distance: function( fromNode, toNode ){ /* impl */ }
}

If no weight function is defined, a constant weight of 1 is used for each edge.

Examples

var fw = cy.elements().floydWarshall();

fw.path('#k', '#g').select();
eles.bellmanFord()    

Perform the Bellman-Ford search algorithm on the elements in the collection. This finds the shortest path from the starting node to all other nodes in the collection.

eles.bellmanFord( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root node (selector or collection) where the search starts.

    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the positive numeric weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm should only go along edges from source to target (default false).

Details

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  /* function that computes the shortest path from root node to the argument node
  (either objects or selector string) */
  pathTo: function(node){ /* impl */ }, 

  /* function that computes the shortest distance from root node to argument node
  (either objects or selector string) */
  distanceTo: function(node){ /* impl */ }, 

  /* true/false. If true, pathTo and distanceTo will be undefined */
  hasNegativeWeightCycle 
}

If no weight function is defined, a constant weight of 1 is used for each edge.

The Bellman-Ford algorithm is good at detecting negative weight cycles, but it can not return path or distance results if it finds them.

Examples

var bf = cy.elements().bellmanFord({ root: "#j" });

bf.pathTo('#g').select();

Spanning

eles.kruskal()    

Perform Kruskal's algorithm on the elements in the collection, returning the minimum spanning tree, assuming undirected edges.

eles.kruskal( [function(edge)] )
  • function(edge) [optional]

    A function that returns the positive numeric weight for the edge.

Details

Note that this function runs Kruskal’s algorithm on the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

Examples

cy.elements().kruskal();

Cut

eles.kargerStein()  

Finds the minimum cut in a graph using the Karger-Stein algorithm. The optimal result is found with a high probability, but without guarantee.

Details

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  cut, /* Collection of edges that are in the cut */
  partition1, /* Collection of nodes that are in the first partition */
  partition2 /* Collection of nodes that are in the second partition */
}

Examples

var ks = cy.elements().kargerStein();

ks.cut.select();

Centrality

eles.degreeCentrality()      
Aliases: eles.dc(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the degree centrality of the specified root node.

eles.degreeCentrality( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root node (selector or collection) for which the centrality calculation is made.

    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the weight for the edge.

    • alpha [optional]

      The alpha value for the centrality calculation, ranging on [0, 1]. With value 0 (default), disregards edge weights and solely uses number of edges in the centrality calculation. With value 1, disregards number of edges and solely uses the edge weights in the centrality calculation.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the directed indegree and outdegree centrality is calculated (true) or whether the undirected centrality is calculated (false, default).

Details

For options.directed: false, this function returns an object of the following form:

{
  degree /* the degree centrality of the root node */
}

For options.directed: true, this function returns an object of the following form:

{
  indegree, /* the indegree centrality of the root node */
  outdegree /* the outdegree centrality of the root node */
}

Examples

console.log( 'dc of j: ' + cy.$().dc({ root: '#j' }).degree );
eles.degreeCentralityNormalized()        
Aliases: eles.dcn(), eles.degreeCentralityNormalised(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the normalised degree centrality of the nodes.

eles.degreeCentralityNormalized( options )
  • options
    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the weight for the edge.

    • alpha [optional]

      The alpha value for the centrality calculation, ranging on [0, 1]. With value 0 (default), disregards edge weights and solely uses number of edges in the centrality calculation. With value 1, disregards number of edges and solely uses the edge weights in the centrality calculation.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the directed indegree and outdegree centrality is calculated (true) or whether the undirected centrality is calculated (false, default).

Details

For options.directed: false, this function returns an object of the following form:

{
  /* the normalised degree centrality of the specified node */
  degree: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
}

For options.directed: true, this function returns an object of the following form:

{
  /* the normalised indegree centrality of the specified node */
  indegree: function( node ){ /* impl */ },

  /* the normalised outdegree centrality of the specified node */ 
  outdegree: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
}

Examples

var dcn = cy.$().dcn();
console.log( 'dcn of j: ' + dcn.degree('#j') );
eles.closenessCentrality()      
Aliases: eles.cc(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the closeness centrality of the specified root node.

eles.closenessCentrality( options )
  • options
    • root

      The root node (selector or collection) for which the centrality calculation is made.

    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm operates on edges in a directed manner from source to target (true) or whether the algorithm operates in an undirected manner (false, default).

    • harmonic [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm calculates the harmonic mean (true, default) or the arithmetic mean (false) of distances. The harmonic mean is very useful for graphs that are not strongly connected.

Details

This function directly returns the numerical closeness centrality value for the specified root node.

Examples

console.log( 'cc of j: ' + cy.$().cc({ root: '#j' }) );
eles.closenessCentralityNormalized()        
Aliases: eles.ccn(), eles.closenessCentralityNormalised(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the closeness centrality of the nodes.

eles.closenessCentralityNormalized( options )
  • options
    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm operates on edges in a directed manner from source to target (true) or whether the algorithm operates in an undirected manner (false, default).

    • harmonic [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm calculates the harmonic mean (true, default) or the arithmetic mean (false) of distances. The harmonic mean is very useful for graphs that are not strongly connected.

Details

This function returns an object of the form:

{
  /* returns the normalised closeness centrality of the specified node */
  closeness: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
}

Examples

var ccn = cy.$().ccn();
console.log( 'ccn of j: ' + ccn.closeness('#j') );
eles.betweennessCentrality()      
Aliases: eles.bc(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the betweenness centrality of the nodes.

eles.betweennessCentrality( options )
  • options
    • weight: function(edge) [optional]

      A function that returns the weight for the edge.

    • directed [optional]

      A boolean indicating whether the algorithm operates on edges in a directed manner from source to target (true) or whether the algorithm operates in an undirected manner (false, default).

Details

This function returns an object of the form:

{
  /* returns the betweenness centrality of the specified node */
  betweenness: function( node ){ /* impl */ },

  /* returns the normalised betweenness centrality of the specified node */
  betweennessNormalized: function( node ){ /* impl */ }
  /* alias : betweennessNormalised() */
}

Examples

var bc = cy.$().bc();
console.log( 'bc of j: ' + bc.betweenness('#j') );
eles.pageRank()    

Rank the nodes in the collection using the Page Rank algorithm.

eles.pageRank( options )
  • options
    • dampingFactor [optional]

      The damping factor, affecting how long the algorithm goes along the topology of the graph (default 0.8).

    • precision [optional]

      Numeric parameter that represents the required precision (default 0.000001). The algorithm stops when the difference between iterations is this value or less.

    • iterations [optional]

      Maximum number of iterations to perform (default 200).

Details

This function returns an object of the following form:

{
  /* function that computes the rank of a given node (either object or selector string) */
  rank: function( node ){ /* impl */ } 
}

Examples

var pr = cy.elements().pageRank();

console.log('g rank: ' + pr.rank('#g'));

Clustering

eles.markovClustering()      
Aliases: eles.mcl(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, run the Markov cluster algorithm of the nodes.

eles.markovClustering( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function(edge) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified edge. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. the attributes of an edge indicate similarity between its nodes.

    • expandFactor [optional]

      A number that affects time of computation and cluster granularity to some extent: M * M (default 2)

    • inflateFactor [optional]

      A number that affects cluster granularity (the greater the value, the more clusters): M(i,j) / E(j) (default 2)

    • multFactor [optional]

      Optional number of self loops for each node. Use a neutral value to improve cluster computations (default 1).

    • maxIterations [optional]

      Maximum number of iterations of the MCL algorithm in a single run (default 20).

Details

Note that this function performs Markov clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection. Markov clustering uses the topology of the graph and the specified edge attributes to determine clusters.

This function returns an array, containing collections. Each collection in the array is a cluster found by the Markov clustering algorithm.

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().markovCluster({
  attributes: [
    function( edge ){ return edge.data('closeness'); }
  ]
});
nodes.kMeans()    

Considering only the nodes in the calling collection, calculate the k-means clustering of the nodes.

nodes.kMeans( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function( node ) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified node. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. two nodes with similar attributes tend to be in the same cluster. Each attribute may have to be normalised in order for the chosen distance metric to make sense. Attributes must be specified unless a custom distance: function( nodeP, nodeQ ) is specified.

    • k

      The number of clusters to return.

    • distance

      The distance classifier used to compare attribute vectors. It is optional if attributes are specified. It may take on one of several values:

      • 'euclidean'

        Euclidean distance (default)

      • 'squaredEuclidean'

        Squared Euclidean distance

      • 'manhattan'

        Manhattan distance

      • 'max'

        Max distance

      • function( length, getPAt, getQAt[, nodeP, nodeQ] )

        A custom function that returns the distance between attribute vectors p and q.

        • length

          The length of the vectors.

        • getPAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the p vector.

        • getQAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the q vector.

        • nodeP [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the p attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

        • nodeQ [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the q attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

      • function( nodeP, nodeQ )

        A custom function that returns the distance between nodeP and nodeQ. This allows for specifying the distance matrix directly, forgoing attributes.

    • maxIterations [optional]

      The maximum number of iterations of the algorithm to run (default 10).

    • sensitivityThreshold [optional]

      The coefficients difference threshold used to determine whether the algorithm has converged (default 0.001).

Details

Note that this function performs k-means clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection. K-means does not normally take into consideration the topology of the graph.

This function returns an array, containing collections. Each collection in the array is a cluster found by the algorithm.

One of the major differences between the k-means and k-medoids algorithms is the manner in which the cluster centres are initialized. In k-means, the cluster centres (centroids) are vectors with elements initialised to random values within each dimension’s range. In k-medoids, the cluster centres (medoids) are random nodes from the data set.

The other is that the k-means algorithm determines new cluster centres by taking the average of all the nodes within that cluster, whereas k-medoids selects the node with the lowest configuration cost as the new cluster centre.

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().kMeans({
  k: 2,
  attributes: [
    function( node ){ return edge.data('weight'); }
  ]
});
nodes.kMedoids()    

Considering only the nodes in the calling collection, calculate the k-medoids clustering of the nodes.

nodes.kMedoids( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function( node ) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified node. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. two nodes with similar attributes tend to be in the same cluster. Each attribute may have to be normalised in order for the chosen distance metric to make sense. Attributes must be specified unless a custom distance: function( nodeP, nodeQ ) is specified.

    • k

      The number of clusters to return.

    • distance

      The distance classifier used to compare attribute vectors. It is optional if attributes are specified. It may take on one of several values:

      • 'euclidean'

        Euclidean distance (default)

      • 'squaredEuclidean'

        Squared Euclidean distance

      • 'manhattan'

        Manhattan distance

      • 'max'

        Max distance

      • function( length, getPAt, getQAt[, nodeP, nodeQ] )

        A custom function that returns the distance between attribute vectors p and q.

        • length

          The length of the vectors.

        • getPAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the p vector.

        • getQAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the q vector.

        • nodeP [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the p attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

        • nodeQ [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the q attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

      • function( nodeP, nodeQ )

        A custom function that returns the distance between nodeP and nodeQ. This allows for specifying the distance matrix directly, forgoing attributes.

    • maxIterations [optional]

      The maximum number of iterations of the algorithm to run (default 10).

Details

Note that this function performs k-mediods clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection. K-medoids does not normally take into consideration topology.

This function returns an array, containing collections. Each collection in the array is a cluster found by the algorithm.

One of the major differences between the k-means and k-medoids algorithms is the manner in which the cluster centres are initialized. In k-means, the cluster centres (centroids) are vectors with elements initialised to random values within each dimension’s range. In k-medoids, the cluster centres (medoids) are random nodes from the data set.

The other is that the k-means algorithm determines new cluster centres by taking the average of all the nodes within that cluster, whereas k-medoids selects the node with the lowest configuration cost as the new cluster centre.

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().kMediods({
  k: 2,
  attributes: [
    function( node ){ return edge.data('weight'); }
  ]
});
nodes.fuzzyCMeans()      
Aliases: nodes.fcm(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the fuzzy c-means clustering of the nodes.

nodes.fuzzyCMeans( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function( node ) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified node. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. two nodes with similar attributes tend to be in the same cluster. Each attribute may have to be normalised in order for the chosen distance metric to make sense. Attributes must be specified unless a custom distance: function( nodeP, nodeQ ) is specified.

    • k

      The number of clusters to return.

    • distance

      The distance classifier used to compare attribute vectors. It is optional if attributes are specified. It may take on one of several values:

      • 'euclidean'

        Euclidean distance (default)

      • 'squaredEuclidean'

        Squared Euclidean distance

      • 'manhattan'

        Manhattan distance

      • 'max'

        Max distance

      • function( length, getPAt, getQAt[, nodeP, nodeQ] )

        A custom function that returns the distance between attribute vectors p and q.

        • length

          The length of the vectors.

        • getPAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the p vector.

        • getQAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the q vector.

        • nodeP [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the p attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

        • nodeQ [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the q attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

      • function( nodeP, nodeQ )

        A custom function that returns the distance between nodeP and nodeQ. This allows for specifying the distance matrix directly, forgoing attributes.

    • maxIterations [optional]

      The maximum number of iterations of the algorithm to run (default 10).

    • sensitivityThreshold [optional]

      The coefficient difference threshold used to determine whether the algorithm has converged (default 0.001).

Details

Note that this function performs fuzzy c-means clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection.

This function returns an object of the following format:

{
  // The resultant clusters
  clusters: [ /* cluster0, cluster1, ... */ ],

  // A two-dimensional array containing a partition matrix
  // degreeOfMembership[i][j] indicates the degree to which nodes[i] belongs to clusters[j]
  degreeOfMembership: [ /* row0, row1, ... */ ]
}

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().fuzzyCMeans({
  k: 2,
  attributes: [
    function( node ){ return edge.data('weight'); }
  ]
});
nodes.hierarchicalClustering()      
Aliases: nodes.hca(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the agglomerative hierarchical clustering of the nodes.

nodes.hierarchicalClustering( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function( node ) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified node. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. two nodes with similar attributes tend to be in the same cluster. Each attribute may have to be normalised in order for the chosen distance metric to make sense. Attributes must be specified unless a custom distance: function( nodeP, nodeQ ) is specified.

    • distance

      The distance classifier used to compare attribute vectors. It is optional if attributes are specified. It may take on one of several values:

      • 'euclidean'

        Euclidean distance (default)

      • 'squaredEuclidean'

        Squared Euclidean distance

      • 'manhattan'

        Manhattan distance

      • 'max'

        Max distance

      • function( length, getPAt, getQAt[, nodeP, nodeQ] )

        A custom function that returns the distance between attribute vectors p and q.

        • length

          The length of the vectors.

        • getPAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the p vector.

        • getQAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the q vector.

        • nodeP [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the p attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

        • nodeQ [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the q attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

      • function( nodeP, nodeQ )

        A custom function that returns the distance between nodeP and nodeQ. This allows for specifying the distance matrix directly, forgoing attributes.

    • linkage [optional]

      The linkage criterion for measuring the distance between two clusters; may be one of 'mean', 'min' (a.k.a. 'single', default), 'max' (a.k.a. 'complete').

    • mode

      The mode of the algorithm. For 'threshold' (default), clusters are merged until they are at least the specified distance apart. For 'dendrogram', the clusters are recursively merged using the branches in a dendrogram (tree) structure beyond a specified depth.

    • threshold

      In mode: 'threshold', distance threshold for stopping the algorithm. All pairs of the returned clusters are at least threshold distance apart. Without specifying this value for mode: 'threshold', all clusters will eventually be merged into a single cluster.

    • dendrogramDepth

      In mode: 'dendrogram', the depth beyond which branches are merged in the tree. For example, a value of 0 (default) results in all branches being merged into a single cluster.

    • addDendrogram [optional]

      In mode: 'dendrogram', whether to add nodes and edges to the graph for the dendrogram (default false). This is not necessary to run the algorithm, but it is useful for visualising the results.

Details

Note that this function performs hierarchical clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection. Hierarchical clustering does not normally take into account the topology of the graph.

This function returns an array, containing collections. Each collection in the array is a cluster found by the algorithm.

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().hca({
  mode: 'threshold',
  threshold: 25,
  attributes: [
    function( node ){ return node.data('weight'); }
  ]
});
nodes.affinityPropagation()      
Aliases: nodes.ap(),

Considering only the elements in the calling collection, calculate the affinity propagation clustering of the nodes.

nodes.affinityPropagation( options )
  • options
    • attributes: [ function( node ) ... ]

      An array of attribute functions, each of which returns a numeric attribute value for the specified node. Attributes are used to cluster the nodes; i.e. two nodes with similar attributes tend to be in the same cluster. Each attribute may have to be normalised in order for the chosen distance metric to make sense. Attributes must be specified unless a custom distance: function( nodeP, nodeQ ) is specified.

    • distance

      The distance classifier used to compare attribute vectors. It is optional if attributes are specified. It may take on one of several values:

      • 'euclidean'

        Euclidean distance (default)

      • 'squaredEuclidean'

        Squared Euclidean distance

      • 'manhattan'

        Manhattan distance

      • 'max'

        Max distance

      • function( length, getPAt, getQAt[, nodeP, nodeQ] )

        A custom function that returns the distance between attribute vectors p and q.

        • length

          The length of the vectors.

        • getPAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the p vector.

        • getQAt(i)

          A function that returns the ith value of the q vector.

        • nodeP [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the p attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

        • nodeQ [optional]

          An optionally-used reference to the node associated with the q attribute vector. It is useful for affecting the weights with information outside of the attributes, such as connectivity.

      • function( nodeP, nodeQ )

        A custom function that returns the distance between nodeP and nodeQ. This allows for specifying the distance matrix directly, forgoing attributes.

    • preference [optional]

      The metric used to determine the suitability of a data point (i.e. node attribute vector) to serve as an exemplar. It may take on one of several special values, which are determined from the similarity matrix (i.e. the negative distance matrix). Or a manual, numeric value may be used (generally of the opposite sign of your distance values). The special values include:

      • 'median'

        Use the median value of the similarity matrix (default).

      • 'mean'

        Use the mean value of the similarity matrix.

      • 'min'

        Use the minimum value of the similarity matrix.

      • 'max'

        Use the maximum value of the similarity matrix.

    • damping [optional]

      A damping factor on [0.5, 1) (default 0.8).

    • minIterations [optional]

      The minimum number of iteraions the algorithm will run before stopping (default 100).

    • minIterations [optional]

      The maximum number of iteraions the algorithm will run before stopping (default 1000).

Details

Note that this function performs affinity propagation clustering on only the subset of the graph in the calling collection. Affinity propagation does not normally take into account the topology of the graph.

This function returns an array, containing collections. Each collection in the array is a cluster found by the algorithm.

Examples

var clusters = cy.elements().ap({
  attributes: [
    function( node ){ return node.data('weight'); }
  ]
});

Compound nodes

These functions apply to compound graphs.

node.isParent()  

Get whether the node is a compound parent (i.e. a node containing one or more child nodes)

node.isChildless()  

Get whether the node is childless (i.e. a node with no child nodes)

node.isChild()  

Get whether the node is a compound child (i.e. contained within a node)

node.isOrphan()  

Get whether the node is an orphan (i.e. a node with no parent)

nodes.parent()    

Get the compound parent node of each node in the collection.

nodes.parent( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.ancestors()      
Aliases: nodes.parents(),

Get all compound ancestor nodes (i.e. parents, parents' parents, etc.) of each node in the collection.

nodes.ancestors( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.commonAncestors()    

Get all compound ancestors common to all the nodes in the collection, starting with the closest and getting progressively farther.

nodes.commonAncestors( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

Details

You can get the closest common ancestor via nodes.commonAncestors().first() and the farthest via nodes.commonAncestors().last(), because the common ancestors are in descending order of closeness.

nodes.orphans()    

Get all orphan (i.e. has no compound parent) nodes in the calling collection.

nodes.orphans( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.nonorphans()    

Get all nonorphan (i.e. has a compound parent) nodes in the calling collection.

nodes.nonorphans( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.children()    

Get all compound child (i.e. direct descendant) nodes of each node in the collection.

nodes.children( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.descendants()    

Get all compound descendant (i.e. children, children's children, etc.) nodes of each node in the collection.

nodes.descendants( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

nodes.siblings()    

Get all sibling (i.e. same compound parent) nodes of each node in the collection.

nodes.siblings( [selector] )
  • selector [optional]

    A selector used to filter the resultant collection.

Selectors

Notes & caveats

A selector functions similar to a CSS selector on DOM elements, but selectors in Cytoscape.js instead work on collections of graph elements. Note that wherever a selector may be specified as the argument to a function, a eles.filter()-style filter function may be used in place of the selector. For example:

cy.$('#j').neighborhood(function( ele ){
  return ele.isEdge();
});

The selectors can be combined together to make powerful queries in Cytoscape.js, for example:

// get all nodes with weight more than 50 and height strictly less than 180
cy.elements("node[weight >= 50][height < 180]");

Selectors can be joined together (effectively creating a logical OR) with commas:

// get node j and the edges coming out from it
cy.elements('node#j, edge[source = "j"]');

It is important to note that strings need to be enclosed by quotation marks:

//cy.filter('node[name = Jerry]'); // this doesn't work
cy.filter('node[name = "Jerry"]'); // but this does

Note that metacharacters ( ^ $ \ / ( ) | ? + * [ ] { } , . ) need to be escaped:

cy.filter('#some\\$funky\\@id');

Group, class, & ID

node, edge, or * (group selector) Matches elements based on group (node for nodes, edge for edges, * for all).

.className Matches elements that have the specified class (e.g. use .foo for a class named “foo”).

#id Matches element with the matching ID (e.g. #foo is the same as [id = 'foo'])

Data

[name] Matches elements if they have the specified data attribute defined, i.e. not undefined (e.g. [foo] for an attribute named “foo”). Here, null is considered a defined value.

[^name] Matches elements if the specified data attribute is not defined, i.e. undefined (e.g [^foo]). Here, null is considered a defined value.

[?name] Matches elements if the specified data attribute is a truthy value (e.g. [?foo]).

[!name] Matches elements if the specified data attribute is a falsey value (e.g. [!foo]).

[name = value] Matches elements if their data attribute matches a specified value (e.g. [foo = 'bar'] or [num = 2]).

[name != value] Matches elements if their data attribute doesn’t match a specified value (e.g. [foo != 'bar'] or [num != 2]).

[name > value] Matches elements if their data attribute is greater than a specified value (e.g. [foo > 'bar'] or [num > 2]).

[name >= value] Matches elements if their data attribute is greater than or equal to a specified value (e.g. [foo >= 'bar'] or [num >= 2]).

[name < value] Matches elements if their data attribute is less than a specified value (e.g. [foo < 'bar'] or [num < 2]).

[name <= value] Matches elements if their data attribute is less than or equal to a specified value (e.g. [foo <= 'bar'] or [num <= 2]).

[name *= value] Matches elements if their data attribute contains the specified value as a substring (e.g. [foo *= 'bar']).

[name ^= value] Matches elements if their data attribute starts with the specified value (e.g. [foo ^= 'bar']).

[name $= value] Matches elements if their data attribute ends with the specified value (e.g. [foo $= 'bar']).

@ (data attribute operator modifier) Prepended to an operator so that is case insensitive (e.g. [foo @$= 'ar'], [foo @>= 'a'], [foo @= 'bar'])

! (data attribute operator modifier) Prepended to an operator so that it is negated (e.g. [foo !$= 'ar'], [foo !>= 'a'])

[[]] (metadata brackets) Use double square brackets in place of square ones to match against metadata instead of data (e.g. [[degree > 2]] matches elements of degree greater than 2). The properties that are supported include degree, indegree, and outdegree.

Compound nodes

> (child selector) Matches direct children of the parent node (e.g. node > node).

  (descendant selector) Matches descendants of the parent node (e.g. node node).

$ (subject selector) Sets the subject of the selector (e.g. $node > node to select the parent nodes instead of the children).

State

Animation

Selection

Locking

Style

User interaction:

In or out of graph

Compound nodes

Edges

Style

Style in Cytoscape.js follows CSS conventions as closely as possible. In most cases, a property has the same name and behaviour as its corresponding CSS namesake. However, the properties in CSS are not sufficient to specify the style of some parts of the graph. In that case, additional properties are introduced that are unique to Cytoscape.js.

For simplicity and ease of use, specificity rules are completely ignored in stylesheets. For a given style property for a given element, the last matching selector wins.

Format

The style specified at initialisation can be in a function format, in a plain JSON format, or in a string format — the plain JSON format and string formats being more useful if you want to pull down the style from the server.

String format

Note that the trailing semicolons for each property are mandatory. Parsing will certainly fail without them.

An example style file:

/* comments may be entered like this */
node {
  background-color: green;
}

At initialisation:

cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  // ...

  style: 'node { background-color: green; }' // probably previously loaded via ajax rather than hardcoded

  // , ...
});

Plain JSON format

cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  // ...

  style: [
    {
      selector: 'node',
      style: {
        'background-color': 'red'
      }
    }

    // , ...
  ]

  // , ...
});

Function format

cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  // ...

  style: cytoscape.stylesheet()
    .selector('node')
      .style({
        'background-color': 'blue'
      })

      // ...


  // , ...
});

You may alternatively use css in place of style, e.g. .selector( ... ).css( ... ) or { selector: ..., css: ... }.

Function values

In the JSON or function stylesheet formats, it is possible to specify a function as the value for a style property. In this manner, the style value can be specified via a function on a per-element basis.

Using a function as a style property value may be convenient in certain cases. However, it may not be a performant option. Thus, it may be worthwhile to use caching if possible, such as by using the lodash _.memoize() function.

Note that if using functions as style values, it will not be possible to serialise and deserialise your stylesheet to JSON proper.

Example:

cytoscape({
  container: document.getElementById('cy'),

  // ...

  style: cytoscape.stylesheet()
    .selector('node')
      .style({
        'background-color': function( ele ){ return ele.data('bg') }

        // which works the same as

        // 'background-color': 'data(bg)'
      })

      // ...


  // , ...
});

Property types

Mappers

In addition to specifying the value of a property outright, the developer may also use a mapper to dynamically specify the property value.

If a mapping is defined, either define the mapped data for all elements or use selectors to limit the mapping to elements that have the mapped data defined. For example, the selector [foo] will apply only to elements with the data field foo defined.

Node body

Shape:

Background:

Gradient:

Border:

Padding:

A padding defines an addition to a node’s dimension. For example, padding adds to a node’s outer (i.e. total) width and height. This can be used to add spacing around the label of width: label; height: label; nodes, or it can be used to add spacing between a compound node parent and its children.

Compound parent sizing:

Background image

A background image may be applied to a node’s body. The following properties support multiple values (space separated or array) with associated indices.

The following properties apply to all images of a node:

The following is an example of valid background image styling using JSON. The example images are taken from Wikimedia Commons with the Creative Commons license.

{
  'background-image': [
    'https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b4/High_above_the_Cloud_the_Sun_Stays_the_Same.jpg',
    'https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fc/Pigeon_silhouette_4874.svg/1000px-Pigeon_silhouette_4874.svg.png'
  ],
  'background-fit': 'cover cover',
  `background-image-opacity`: 0.5
}

Pie chart background

These properties allow you to create pie chart backgrounds on nodes. Note that 16 slices maximum are supported per node, so in the properties 1 <= i <= 16. Of course, you must specify a numerical value for each property in place of i. Each nonzero sized slice is placed in order of i, starting from the 12 o’clock position and working clockwise.

You may find it useful to reserve a number to a particular colour for all nodes in your stylesheet. Then you can specify values for pie-i-background-size accordingly for each node via a mapper. This would allow you to create consistently coloured pie charts in each node of the graph based on element data.

Edge line

These properties affect the styling of an edge’s line:

Gradient

Bezier edges

For automatic, bundled bezier edges (curve-style: bezier):

A bezier edge is bundled with all other parallel bezier edges. Each bezier edge is a quadratic bezier curve, separated from the others by varying the control point. If there is an odd number of parallel edges in a bundle, then the centre edge is drawn as a straight line.

Loop edges

For loops (i.e. same source and target):

A loop is normally drawn as a pair of quadratic bezier curves, one bezier going away from the node and the second bezier going back towards the node.

Note that loops may only be bezier or unbundled-bezier for their curve-style.

Unbundled bezier edges

For bezier edges with manual control points (curve-style: unbundled-bezier):

An unbundled bezier edge is made of a series of one or more quadratic bezier curves — one control point per curve. The control points of the bezier curves are specified manually, using a co-ordinate system relative to the source and target node. This maintains the overall curve shape regardless of the positions of the connected nodes.

When two or more control points are specified for an unbundled bezier edge, each adjacent pair of bezier curves is joined at the midpoint of the two control points. This makes most curves join smoothly.

Haystack edges

For fast, straight line edges (curve-style: haystack):

Haystack edges are a more performant replacement for plain, straight line edges. A haystack edge is drawn as a straight line from the source node to the target node, randomly placed along some angle from each node’s centre. In this manner, many parallel haystack edges make a tight bundle, especially when semitransparent. This makes haystack edges an effective way to visualise graphs with a high number of parallel edges.

Loop edges and compound parent nodes are not supported by haystack edges. Also note that source and target arrows are not supported for haystack edges, as the arrows would be behind the node body. Mid arrows, however, are supported.

Segments edges

For edges made of several straight lines (curve-style: segments):

A segment edge is made of a series of one or more straight lines, using a co-ordinate system relative to the source and target nodes. This maintains the overall line pattern regardless of the orientation of the positions of the source and target nodes.

Straight edges

A straight edge (curve-style: straight) is drawn as a single straight line from the outside of the source node shape to the outside of the target node shape. Endpoint and midpoint arrows are supported on straight edges. Straight edges are not generally suitable for multigraphs.

Edge arrow

For each edge arrow property above, replace <pos> with one of

Only mid arrows are supported on haystack edges.

Edge endpoints

source-endpoint & target-endpoint : Specifies the endpoint of the source side of the edge and the target side of the edge, respectively. There are several options for how those properties can be set:

The endpoints for edges can be shifted away from the source and target node:

Endpoint modification is not supported for curve-style: haystack edges for performance reasons.

Visibility

Elements are drawn in a specific order based on compound depth (low to high), the element type (typically nodes above edges), and z-index (low to high). These styles affect the ordering:

Labels

Label text:

Basic font styling:

Wrapping text:

Node label alignment:

Edge label alignment:

Margins:

Rotating text:

Outline:

Background:

Border:

Interactivity:

Events

Overlay

These properties allow for the creation of overlays on top of nodes or edges, and are often used in the :active state.

Ghost

The ghost properties allow for creating a ghosting effect, a semitransparent duplicate of the element drawn at an offset.

Transition animation

Core

These properties affect UI global to the graph, and apply only to the core. You can use the special core selector string to set these properties.

Indicator:

Selection box:

Texture during viewport gestures:

Events

Event object

Events passed to handler callbacks are similar to jQuery event objects and React synthetic events in that they wrap native event objects, mimicking their API.

Fields:

Fields for only user input device events:

Fields for only layout events:

Event bubbling

All events that occur on elements get bubbled up to compound parents and then to the core. You must take this into consideration when listening to the core so you can differentiate between events that happened on the background and ones that happened on elements. Use the eventObj.target field, which indicates the originator of the event (i.e. eventObj.target === cy || eventObj.target === someEle).

User input device events

These are normal browser events that you can listen to via Cytoscape.js. You can listen to these events on the core and on collections.

There are also some higher level events that you can use so you don’t have to listen to different events for mouse-input devices and for touch devices.

Collection events

These events are custom to Cytoscape.js. You can listen to these events for collections.

Graph events

These events are custom to Cytoscape.js, and they occur on the core.

Layouts

The function of a layout is to set the positions on the nodes in the graph. Layouts are extensions of Cytoscape.js such that it is possible for anyone to write a layout without modifying the library itself.

Several layouts are included with Cytoscape.js by default, and their options are described in the sections that follow with the default values specified. Note that you must set options.name to the name of the layout to specify which one you want to run.

Each layout has its own algorithm for setting the position for each node. This algorithm influences the overall shape of the graph and the lengths of the edges. A layout’s algorithm can be customised by setting its options. Therefore, edge lengths can be controlled by setting the layout options appropriately.

For force-directed (physics) layouts, there is generally an option to set a weight to each edge to affect the relative edge lengths. Edge length can also be affected by options like spacing factors, angles, and overlap avoidance. Setting edge length depends on the particular layout, and some layouts will allow for more precise edge lengths than others.

null

The null layout puts all nodes at (0, 0). It’s useful for debugging purposes.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'null',

  ready: function(){}, // on layoutready
  stop: function(){} // on layoutstop
};

cy.layout( options );

random

The random layout puts nodes in random positions within the viewport.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'random',

  fit: true, // whether to fit to viewport
  padding: 30, // fit padding
  boundingBox: undefined, // constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts 
};

cy.layout( options );

preset

The preset layout puts nodes in the positions you specify manually.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'preset',

  positions: undefined, // map of (node id) => (position obj); or function(node){ return somPos; }
  zoom: undefined, // the zoom level to set (prob want fit = false if set)
  pan: undefined, // the pan level to set (prob want fit = false if set)
  fit: true, // whether to fit to viewport
  padding: 30, // padding on fit
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts 
};

cy.layout( options );

grid

The grid layout puts nodes in a well-spaced grid.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'grid',

  fit: true, // whether to fit the viewport to the graph
  padding: 30, // padding used on fit
  boundingBox: undefined, // constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  avoidOverlap: true, // prevents node overlap, may overflow boundingBox if not enough space
  avoidOverlapPadding: 10, // extra spacing around nodes when avoidOverlap: true
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: false, // Excludes the label when calculating node bounding boxes for the layout algorithm
  spacingFactor: undefined, // Applies a multiplicative factor (>0) to expand or compress the overall area that the nodes take up
  condense: false, // uses all available space on false, uses minimal space on true
  rows: undefined, // force num of rows in the grid
  cols: undefined, // force num of columns in the grid
  position: function( node ){}, // returns { row, col } for element
  sort: undefined, // a sorting function to order the nodes; e.g. function(a, b){ return a.data('weight') - b.data('weight') }
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts 
};

cy.layout( options );

circle

The circle layout puts nodes in a circle.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'circle',

  fit: true, // whether to fit the viewport to the graph
  padding: 30, // the padding on fit
  boundingBox: undefined, // constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  avoidOverlap: true, // prevents node overlap, may overflow boundingBox and radius if not enough space
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: false, // Excludes the label when calculating node bounding boxes for the layout algorithm
  spacingFactor: undefined, // Applies a multiplicative factor (>0) to expand or compress the overall area that the nodes take up
  radius: undefined, // the radius of the circle
  startAngle: 3 / 2 * Math.PI, // where nodes start in radians
  sweep: undefined, // how many radians should be between the first and last node (defaults to full circle)
  clockwise: true, // whether the layout should go clockwise (true) or counterclockwise/anticlockwise (false)
  sort: undefined, // a sorting function to order the nodes; e.g. function(a, b){ return a.data('weight') - b.data('weight') }
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts 

};

cy.layout( options );

concentric

The concentric layout positions nodes in concentric circles, based on a metric that you specify to segregate the nodes into levels. This layout sets the concentric value in ele.scratch().

Options

let options = {
  name: 'concentric',

  fit: true, // whether to fit the viewport to the graph
  padding: 30, // the padding on fit
  startAngle: 3 / 2 * Math.PI, // where nodes start in radians
  sweep: undefined, // how many radians should be between the first and last node (defaults to full circle)
  clockwise: true, // whether the layout should go clockwise (true) or counterclockwise/anticlockwise (false)
  equidistant: false, // whether levels have an equal radial distance betwen them, may cause bounding box overflow
  minNodeSpacing: 10, // min spacing between outside of nodes (used for radius adjustment)
  boundingBox: undefined, // constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  avoidOverlap: true, // prevents node overlap, may overflow boundingBox if not enough space
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: false, // Excludes the label when calculating node bounding boxes for the layout algorithm
  height: undefined, // height of layout area (overrides container height)
  width: undefined, // width of layout area (overrides container width)
  spacingFactor: undefined, // Applies a multiplicative factor (>0) to expand or compress the overall area that the nodes take up
  concentric: function( node ){ // returns numeric value for each node, placing higher nodes in levels towards the centre
  return node.degree();
  },
  levelWidth: function( nodes ){ // the letiation of concentric values in each level
  return nodes.maxDegree() / 4;
  },
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts
};

cy.layout( options );

breadthfirst

The breadthfirst layout puts nodes in a hierarchy, based on a breadthfirst traversal of the graph. It is best suited to trees and forests in its default top-down mode, and it is best suited to DAGs in its circle mode.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'breadthfirst',

  fit: true, // whether to fit the viewport to the graph
  directed: false, // whether the tree is directed downwards (or edges can point in any direction if false)
  padding: 30, // padding on fit
  circle: false, // put depths in concentric circles if true, put depths top down if false
  grid: false, // whether to create an even grid into which the DAG is placed (circle:false only)
  spacingFactor: 1.75, // positive spacing factor, larger => more space between nodes (N.B. n/a if causes overlap)
  boundingBox: undefined, // constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  avoidOverlap: true, // prevents node overlap, may overflow boundingBox if not enough space
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: false, // Excludes the label when calculating node bounding boxes for the layout algorithm
  roots: undefined, // the roots of the trees
  maximal: false, // whether to shift nodes down their natural BFS depths in order to avoid upwards edges (DAGS only)
  animate: false, // whether to transition the node positions
  animationDuration: 500, // duration of animation in ms if enabled
  animationEasing: undefined, // easing of animation if enabled,
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; }, // a function that determines whether the node should be animated.  All nodes animated by default on animate enabled.  Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  ready: undefined, // callback on layoutready
  stop: undefined, // callback on layoutstop
  transform: function (node, position ){ return position; } // transform a given node position. Useful for changing flow direction in discrete layouts
};

cy.layout( options );

cose

The cose (Compound Spring Embedder) layout uses a physics simulation to lay out graphs. It works well with noncompound graphs and it has additional logic to support compound graphs well.

It was implemented by Gerardo Huck as part of Google Summer of Code 2013 (Mentors: Max Franz, Christian Lopes, Anders Riutta, Ugur Dogrusoz).

Based on the article “A layout algorithm for undirected compound graphs” by Ugur Dogrusoz, Erhan Giral, Ahmet Cetintas, Ali Civril and Emek Demir.

The cose layout is very fast and produces good results. The cose-bilkent extension is an evolution of the algorithm that is more computationally expensive but produces near-perfect results.

Options

let options = {
  name: 'cose',

  // Called on `layoutready`
  ready: function(){},

  // Called on `layoutstop`
  stop: function(){},

  // Whether to animate while running the layout
  // true : Animate continuously as the layout is running
  // false : Just show the end result
  // 'end' : Animate with the end result, from the initial positions to the end positions
  animate: true,

  // Easing of the animation for animate:'end'
  animationEasing: undefined,

  // The duration of the animation for animate:'end'
  animationDuration: undefined,

  // A function that determines whether the node should be animated
  // All nodes animated by default on animate enabled
  // Non-animated nodes are positioned immediately when the layout starts
  animateFilter: function ( node, i ){ return true; },


  // The layout animates only after this many milliseconds for animate:true
  // (prevents flashing on fast runs)
  animationThreshold: 250,

  // Number of iterations between consecutive screen positions update
  refresh: 20,

  // Whether to fit the network view after when done
  fit: true,

  // Padding on fit
  padding: 30,

  // Constrain layout bounds; { x1, y1, x2, y2 } or { x1, y1, w, h }
  boundingBox: undefined,

  // Excludes the label when calculating node bounding boxes for the layout algorithm
  nodeDimensionsIncludeLabels: false,

  // Randomize the initial positions of the nodes (true) or use existing positions (false)
  randomize: false,

  // Extra spacing between components in non-compound graphs
  componentSpacing: 40,

  // Node repulsion (non overlapping) multiplier
  nodeRepulsion: function( node ){ return 2048; },

  // Node repulsion (overlapping) multiplier
  nodeOverlap: 4,

  // Ideal edge (non nested) length
  idealEdgeLength: function( edge ){ return 32; },

  // Divisor to compute edge forces
  edgeElasticity: function( edge ){ return 32; },

  // Nesting factor (multiplier) to compute ideal edge length for nested edges
  nestingFactor: 1.2,

  // Gravity force (constant)
  gravity: 1,

  // Maximum number of iterations to perform
  numIter: 1000,

  // Initial temperature (maximum node displacement)
  initialTemp: 1000,

  // Cooling factor (how the temperature is reduced between consecutive iterations
  coolingFactor: 0.99,

  // Lower temperature threshold (below this point the layout will end)
  minTemp: 1.0,

  // Pass a reference to weaver to use threads for calculations
  weaver: false
};

cy.layout( options );

Layout manipulation

Layouts have a set of functions available to them, which allow for more complex behaviour than the primary run-one-layout-at-a-time usecase. A new, developer accessible layout can be made via cy.layout().

layout.run()    
Aliases: layout.start(),

Start running the layout.

Details

If the layout is asynchronous (i.e. continuous), then calling layout.run() simply starts the layout. Synchronous (i.e. discrete) layouts finish before layout.run() returns. Whenever the layout is started, the layoutstart event is emitted.

The layout will emit the layoutstop event when it has finished or has been otherwise stopped (e.g. by calling layout.stop()). The developer can listen to layoutstop using layout.on() or setting the layout options appropriately with a callback.

Examples

var layout = cy.layout({ name: 'random' });

layout.run();
layout.stop()  

Stop running the (asynchronous/discrete) layout.

Details

Calling layout.stop() stops an asynchronous (continuous) layout. It’s useful if you want to prematurely stop a running layout.

Examples

var layout = cy.layout({ name: 'cose' });

layout.run();

// some time later...
setTimeout(function(){
  layout.stop();
}, 100);

Layout events

layout.on()          
Aliases: layout.bind(), layout.listen(), layout.addListener(),

Listen to events that are emitted by the layout.

layout.on( events [data]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • data [optional]

    A plain object which is passed to the handler in the event object argument.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

layout.promiseOn()      
Aliases: layout.pon(),

Get a promise that is resolved when the layout emits the first of any of the specified events.

layout.promiseOn( events )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

Examples

var layout = cy.layout({ name: 'random' });

layout.pon('layoutstop').then(function( event ){
  console.log('layoutstop promise fulfilled');
});

layout.run();
layout.one()    

Listen to events that are emitted by the layout, and run the handler only once.

layout.one( events [data]function(event) )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • data [optional]

    A plain object which is passed to the handler in the event object argument.

  • function(event)

    The handler function that is called when one of the specified events occurs.

    • event

      The event object.

layout.removeListener()          
Aliases: layout.off(), layout.unbind(), layout.unlisten(),

Remove event handlers on the layout.

layout.removeListener( events [handler] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names.

  • handler [optional]

    A reference to the handler function to remove.

layout.emit()      
Aliases: layout.trigger(),

Emit one or more events on the layout.

layout.emit( events [extraParams] )
  • events

    A space separated list of event names to emit.

  • extraParams [optional]

    An array of additional parameters to pass to the handler.

Animations

An animation represents a visible change in state over a duration of time for a single element. Animations can be generated via cy.animation() (for animations on the viewport) and ele.animation() (for animations on graph elements).

Animation manipulation

ani.play()    
Aliases: ani.run(),

Requests that the animation be played, starting on the next frame. If the animation is complete, it restarts from the beginning.

Examples

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.play();
ani.playing()    
Aliases: ani.running(),

Get whether the animation is currently playing.

ani.progress() et al              

Get or set how far along the animation has progressed.

ani.progress()

Get the progress of the animation in percent.

ani.progress( progress )

Set the progress of the animation in percent.

  • progress

    The progress in percent (i.e. between 0 and 1 inclusive) to set to the animation.

ani.time()

Get the progress of the animation in milliseconds.

ani.time( time )

Set the progress of the animation in milliseconds.

  • time

    The progress in milliseconds (i.e. between 0 and the duration inclusive) to set to the animation.

ani.rewind()

Rewind the animation to the beginning.

ani.fastforward()

Fastforward the animation to the end.

Examples

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

// set animation to 50% and then play
jAni.progress(0.5).play();
ani.pause()  

Pause the animation, maintaining the current progress.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var jAni = j.animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.play();

// pause about midway
setTimeout(function(){
  jAni.pause();
}, 500);
ani.stop()  

Stop the animation, maintaining the current progress and removing the animation from any associated queues.

Details

This function is useful in situations where you don’t want to run an animation any more. Calling ani.stop() is analogous to calling ele.stop() in that the animation is no longer queued.

Calling ani.stop() makes animation frames faster by reducing the number of animations to check per element per frame. You should call ani.stop() when you want to clean up an animation, especially in situations with many animations. You can still reuse a stopped animation, but an animation that has not been stopped can not be garbage collected unless its associated target (i.e. element or core instance) is garbage collected as well.

Examples

var j = cy.$('#j');
var jAni = j.animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.play();

// stop about midway
setTimeout(function(){
  jAni.stop();
}, 500);
ani.completed()    
Aliases: ani.complete(),

Get whether the animation has progressed to the end.

ani.apply()  

Apply the animation at its current progress.

Details

This function allows you to step directly to a particular progress of the animation while it’s paused.

Examples

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.progress(0.5).apply();
ani.applying()  

Get whether the animation is currently applying.

ani.reverse()  

Reverse the animation such that its starting conditions and ending conditions are reversed.

Examples

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni
  .play() // start
  .promise('completed').then(function(){ // on next completed
    jAni
      .reverse() // switch animation direction
      .rewind() // optional but makes intent clear
      .play() // start again
    ;
  })
;
ani.promise()      

Get a promise that is fulfilled with the specified animation event.

ani.promise()

Get a promise that is fulfilled with the next completed event.

ani.promise( animationEvent )

Get a promise that is fulfilled with the specified animation event.

  • animationEvent

    A string for the event name; completed or complete for completing the animation or frame for the next frame of the animation.

Examples

When ani.apply() has updated the element style:

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    'background-color': 'red',
    'width': 75
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.progress(0.5).apply().promise('frame').then(function(){
  console.log('j has now has its style at 50% of the animation');
});

When ani.play() is done:

var jAni = cy.$('#j').animation({
  style: {
    height: 60
  },
  duration: 1000
});

jAni.play().promise().then(function(){
  console.log('animation done');
});

Extensions

You can use an extension (e.g. cy-ext) as follows with cytoscape.use():

cytoscape.use( require('cy-ext') );

Using import, the above example would be:

import ext from 'cy-ext';

cytoscape.use( ext );

The extensions below are a curated list. To add your extension, please submit a request that includes your extension’s URL and a one line description.

denotes a first-party extension, one that is maintained by groups associated with the Cytoscape Consortium.

denotes a third-party extension, one that is maintained by outside developers.

UI extensions

Layout extensions

API extensions

Registration

To register an extension, make the following call: cytoscape( type, name, extension );

The value of type can take on the following values:

The name argument indicates the name of the extension. For example, cytoscape( 'collection', 'fooBar', function(){ return 'baz'; } ) registers eles.fooBar().

Autoscaffolding

There is a Slush project for Cytoscape.js such that the full project scaffolding for a new extension is automatically generated for you. By following the included instructions, you can easily create Cytoscape.js extensions that are well organised, easily maintained, and published.

Performance

Background

You may notice that performance starts to degrade on graphs with large numbers of elements. This happens for several reasons:

Optimisations

You can get much better performance out of Cytoscape.js by tuning your options, in descending order of significance: